Definition of herbage in English:

herbage

Line breaks: herb|age
Pronunciation: /ˈhəːbɪdʒ
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
1Herbaceous vegetation: after rain, tall herbage invariably collapses on to the paths
More example sentences
  • This side of the city was green with small trees, herbage, and bushes.
  • Blinman had become ‘the garden of the north’ with valleys and hills covered with splendid herbage.
  • You can use almost any herbage and leaves in it; wet and turn with a fork regularly.
1.1The succulent part of herbaceous vegetation, used as pasture: the herbage of this area produces the milk necessary to make a fine cheese
More example sentences
  • Standing herbage mass in the pastures was estimated by measuring the forage height with a rising-plate meter in 25 places along evenly spaced, predetermined paced transects.
  • As previously discussed, consumption in April was primarily of vegetative, high moisture herbage, and in May and June, consumed material was of greater maturity and less moisture.
  • Below-normal precipitation in 2002 and the resulting shift in available water and herbage has created some concern among conservationists for migrators such as Sandhill cranes.
1.2 historical The right of pasture on another person’s land: the warden of Windsor Forest was granted as part of his farm the herbage of the whole forest
More example sentences
  • The Corporation made a most liberal offer, perhaps thought too generous, seeing that the real ownership of the soil of the Strays rested with them, and the Freemen's rights only extended to the herbage or pasturage.
  • There is evidence, no doubt, in this case of a long-continued practice of letting herbage on the road for the pasturage, not of sheep exclusively, but also of a limited number of horses and cattle.
  • Henry Cornish for farm of a parcel of herbage at the rear of St. John's.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French erbage, based on Latin herba 'herb, grass, crops'.

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