Definition of hoarse in English:

hoarse

Line breaks: hoarse
Pronunciation: /hɔːs
 
/

adjective

(Of a person’s voice) sounding rough and harsh, typically as the result of a sore throat or of shouting: a hoarse whisper
More example sentences
  • Ear, nose and throat clinics have been taking patients every day complaining of hoarse voices and throat pains.
  • My voice is hoarse and croaky, my hands hurt and I'm still shaking!
  • Bloom's voice was too hoarse for the scream and the words left his throat in a painful screech.
Synonyms

Origin

Old English hās, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch hees. The spelling with r was influenced in Middle English by an Old Norse cognate.

Derivatives

hoarsely

adverb
More example sentences
  • A Park Avenue-type like Dean shouting hoarsely somehow doesn't compute.
  • At a spankingly spruced-up Corran Park, the home crowd were roaring hoarsely inside the opening minute.
  • ‘Thank you,’ he whispered hoarsely, and Tibyn could see how much he meant it.

hoarsen

verb
More example sentences
  • When voicebox cartilage is inflamed, the voice hoarsens.
  • His deep voice enquired, hoarsened by expensive, hand-rolled Cuban cigars that Kaethe guessed all businessmen had an ample supply of.
  • ‘We have announced ourselves with camarada in a voice strangled and hoarsened by fear,’ he explains.

hoarseness

noun
More example sentences
  • Very few patients report upper respiratory tract symptoms such as rhinorrhoea, nasal obstruction, sneezing, sore throat, or hoarseness.
  • Some consistent clinical findings are nonproductive cough, low-grade fever, sore throat and hoarseness.
  • It is unlikely that you will experience any problems after the test other than a mild sore throat, hoarseness, cough, or muscle aches.

Definition of hoarse in:

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