Definition of homily in English:

homily

Line breaks: hom¦ily
Pronunciation: /ˈhɒmɪli
 
/

noun (plural homilies)

1A religious discourse which is intended primarily for spiritual edification rather than doctrinal instruction.
More example sentences
  • The conclave opens with a Mass of the Holy Spirit, including a key homily stressing the particular challenges facing the next pope.
  • I had seen him on October 22, 1978, in his first homily as pope, admonishing and encouraging the whole of humanity to be not afraid.
  • The spammed messages were sometimes accompanied by a religious homily or endorsement.
Synonyms
1.1A tedious moralizing lecture: she delivered her homily about the need for patience
More example sentences
  • Indeed, he now regularly appears at right-wing seminars and lectures to deliver his homilies on the President's failings as a man and as a leader.
  • What is wrong is the inability to resist the temptation of delivering a moralistic little homily when someone does take out one of your seductively promoted loans.
  • The next day the Chancellor went to the Mansion House, probably in the same creased suit, and delivered his annual homily on the state of the economy.

Origin

late Middle English: via Old French from ecclesiastical Latin homilia, from Greek, 'discourse, conversation' (in ecclesiastical use, 'sermon'), from homilos 'crowd'.

Derivatives

homilist

noun
More example sentences
  • St. Ephrem, one of the most renowned and lyrical homilists of the Eastern Church, beautifully described the praise of God flowing from us like a wellspring of water.
  • He's an excellent, edifying, and courageous homilist; he never waters down the Gospel message to suit modern sensibilities.
  • The guest homilist was Fr. Dermot Burns, Parish Priest of Straide, Co. Mayo.

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