Definition of hortatory in English:

hortatory

Line breaks: hor|ta¦tory
Pronunciation: /ˈhɔːtət(ə)ri
 
/

adjective

Tending or aiming to exhort: a series of hortatory epistles
More example sentences
  • Political commentators, by contrast, are hortatory and didactic - and angry.
  • Thus there are really two kinds of story: that which shapes the Jesus narrative in each Gospel, and that which influences the didactic and hortatory arguments in the Epistles.
  • The poems, plays, and essays of the committed cultural nationalist are characterized by a markedly hortatory or didactic manner.
Synonyms

Origin

late 16th century: from Latin hortatorius, from hortari 'exhort'.

Derivatives

hortation

Pronunciation: /hɔːˈteɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
More example sentences
  • And in any event, whether he is successful strategically, is wholly irrelevant and has nothing to do with your hortation to avoid ‘blanket judgments.’
  • But, despite Edward Steichen's hortation that the goal of photography is to explain man to his fellow man, the fact is that photographs suggest much but explain very little.
  • And your basis for such a hortation would be what exactly?

hortative

Pronunciation: /ˈhɔːtətɪv/
adjective
More example sentences
  • Its hortative function barely survives outside of a few locutions, but ‘God bless… ‘is one of those.’
  • The simplified illustrations of the corpses in the Dainenbutsuji version even seem to laugh rather than howl in death, perhaps out of an intention to deliver the subject of the decaying corpse in a less hortative manner.
  • The anonymous yet commanding voice of the David-like poet then reappears and neatly concludes the poem with its final hortative: ‘With Circes let them dwell that thinke not so.’

Definition of hortatory in:

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