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hundred

Line breaks: hun|dred
Pronunciation: /ˈhʌndrəd
 
/

Definition of hundred in English:

cardinal number (plural hundreds or (with numeral or quantifying word) hundred)

(a/one hundred)
1The number equivalent to the product of ten and ten; ten more than ninety; 100: a hundred yards away there are just a hundred of us here (Roman numeral: c or C)
More example sentences
  • I'm fortunate in that I only get ten to twenty per day, but I know people who receive ninety to a hundred, which is a real pain.
  • By the way, ninety to a hundred years ago, this was the first stop for a variety of immigrants.
  • On the day a hundred consumers accessed the server and downloaded the product, a hundred units had been distributed.
Synonyms
century
informal ton
1.1 (hundreds) The numbers from one hundred to 999: an unknown number, probably in the hundreds, had already been lost
More example sentences
  • Eric estimates his audience to number in the low hundreds.
  • Current playable songs number only in the hundreds.
  • The coalition says the gunmen number in the hundreds.
1.2 (hundreds) Several hundred things or people: her coat cost hundreds of pounds
More example sentences
  • A brass band played salsa tunes as hundreds of protesters of myriad nationalities danced, sang and chanted in colourful, unthreatening resistance.
  • If the figures are multiplied nationally hundreds of potentially serious errors are taking place annually.
  • Cost is an important factor for patients on multiple medications often costing hundreds of dollars per month.
1.3 (usually hundreds) informal An unspecified large number: hundreds of letters poured in
1.4 (the —— hundreds) The years of a specified century: the early nineteen hundreds
1.5One hundred years old: you must be over a hundred!
More example sentences
  • So, for a wolverine, living to ninety or a hundred or more would not be a big deal.
1.6One hundred miles per hour.
1.7 Cricket A batsman’s score of a hundred runs or more: his ninth Test hundred
More example sentences
  • Yet, ever since became a Test opener, he has scored a hundred in every series except in New Zealand, a feat not achieved by any of his illustrious colleagues.
  • Personally, I would like nothing more than scoring a hundred at Lord's.
  • As soon as he completed his run, he lifted his bat and waved it at the crowds, the way a batsman does when he scores a 50 or a hundred.
1.8(Chiefly in spoken English) used to express whole hours in the twenty-four-hour system: twelve hundred hours

noun

British historical Back to top  
A subdivision of a county or shire, having its own court: Wantage Hundred

Origin

late Old English, from hund 'hundred' (from an Indo-European root shared with Latin centum and Greek hekaton) + a second element meaning 'number'; of Germanic origin and related to Dutch honderd and German hundert. The noun sense 'subdivision of a county' is of uncertain origin: it may originally have been equivalent to a hundred hides of land (see hide3).

More
  • Old English had two words for this number. One was hund, which came from an ancient root shared by Latin centum—as in cent (L18 for the money), centigrade (early 19th century), century, and many other cent- words—and Greek hekaton (the source of hectare (early 19th century)). The other was hundred, which was formed from the same element plus another meaning ‘number’. Hundred was also then used to refer to a division of a county or shire that had its own court. This unit may originally have been equivalent to a hundred hides of land—a hide is an ancient measure typically equal to between 60 and 100 acres, which varied from area to area because it was a measure of the area of land which would feed a family and its dependants.

Phrases

a (or one) hundred per cent

1
Entirely; completely: I’m not a hundred per cent sure
More example sentences
  • Addressing a packed press conference he said: ‘I am one hundred per cent responsible for this loss.’
  • It has its advantages, but I don't think it's a hundred per cent a good thing.
[usually with negative] informal 1.1 Completely fit and healthy: she did not feel one hundred per cent
informal 1.1 Maximum effort and commitment: he always gave one hundred per cent for United
More example sentences
  • However for the last 3-4 years it seems that giving a hundred per cent is an occasional bonus.

Derivatives

hundredfold

1
adjective& adverb
Example sentences
  • As compared to 18 months ago when I first arrived, the traffic has increased a hundredfold.
  • ‘Since I started off in management, the pressure on managers has magnified a hundredfold,’ he laments.
  • The first thing I noticed upon entering the room, of course, was that the smell of decaying flowers had increased almost a hundredfold even from last night.

Words that rhyme with hundred

Herodunanswered

Definition of hundred in:

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