Definition of imminent in English:

imminent

Line breaks: im¦mi|nent
Pronunciation: /ˈɪmɪnənt
 
/

adjective

  • 2 archaic Overhanging.

Derivatives

imminence

noun
More example sentences
  • And then, early afternoon, not fifteen minutes after I'd forecast the immediate imminence of rain, we had a fierce hailstorm, closely followed by torrential rain.
  • The imminence or immediacy of the threat to the peace determines what action is reasonable.
  • But he was feisty in the face of death, no longer in any doubt about its imminence.

imminently

adverb
More example sentences
  • It may seem appealing to protect speech but only if it doesn't imminently threaten likely psychological harm to the children, but such an approach will likely prove unhelpful.
  • And that was supported by a Downing Street spokesman who added: ‘It is still a live option but don't expect a decision imminently.’
  • Work on the football pitch is due to commence within a matter of weeks and the Committee are hopeful that they will have a positive response to a further Lottery funding application imminently.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin imminent- 'overhanging, impending', from the verb imminere, from in- 'upon, towards' + minere 'to project'.

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