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impetus

Line breaks: im|petus
Pronunciation: /ˈɪmpɪtəs
 
/

Definition of impetus in English:

noun

[mass noun]
1The force or energy with which a body moves: hit the booster coil before the flywheel loses all its impetus
Synonyms
momentum, propulsion, impulsion, impelling force, motive force, driving force, drive, thrust, continuing motion;
energy, force, power, push, steam, strength
1.1Something that makes a process or activity happen or happen more quickly: the ending of the Cold War gave new impetus to idealism
More example sentences
  • The requirements of homogeneous diesel combustion processes give additional impetuses to the continued development of piezo controls for unit injector systems.
  • The expanded literature search was very coincident with the initial search, providing most of the same reasons, purposes, and impetuses for developing peer institution selection systems.
  • One of the most interesting points to emerge is a recognition that with hindsight, European radicalism has once again written itself as a form of diffusionism, its sources and impetuses exclusive unto itself.
Synonyms

Origin

mid 17th century: from Latin, 'assault, force', from impetere 'assail', from in- 'towards' + petere 'seek'.

More
  • compete from (early 17th century):

    This word is from Latin competere in its late sense ‘strive or contend for (something)’: the elements here are com- ‘together’ and petere ‘aim at, seek’. As well as giving us competition (early 17th century) this is also the source of competent (Late Middle English); while petere gives us: impetus [M17] and impetuous (Late Middle English) ‘seek towards, assail’; petition (Middle English) an act of seeking for something; petulant (late 16th century) originally immodest in what you seek; and repeat (Late Middle English) seek again.

Words that rhyme with impetus

emeritusspiritous

Definition of impetus in:

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Pronunciation: ˈtɛnɪbrəs
adjective
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