Definition of impinge in English:

impinge

Line breaks: im|pinge
Pronunciation: /ɪmˈpɪn(d)ʒ
 
/

verb (impinges, impinging, impinged)

[no object]
  • 1Have an effect, especially a negative one: several factors impinge on market efficiency
    More example sentences
    • More than 1800 people - a pretty large focus group - were asked about the environmental factors that impinge most negatively upon their daily lives.
    • One of the sacred precepts of modern educational theory is that you must never impinge negatively on the pupil's self-esteem.
    • Those who oppose these laws argue that the legislation impinges far too much on civil liberties and strikes at the heart of some of the basic tenants of our democracy and judicial system.
    Synonyms
    affect, have an effect on, have a bearing on, touch, influence, exert influence on, make an impression on, make an impact on, leave a mark on
  • 1.1Advance over an area belonging to someone or something else; encroach: the proposed fencing would impinge on a public bridleway
    More example sentences
    • He wrote: ‘Whilst it does not appear to impinge too much on the Micklegate area, we do have an abundance of clubs and pubs in the area, which sometimes does have a detrimental effect on Micklegate.’
    Synonyms
  • 1.2 (impinge on/upon) Physics Strike: the gases impinge on the surface of the liquid
    More example sentences
    • When using the laser beam for welding the electromagnetic radiation impinges on the surface of the base metal with such a concentration of energy that the temperature of the surface is melted and volatilized.
    • Waves of any sort set up sympathetic vibrations in the materials they impinge upon, which is the principle behind many many things, including telephones and radar.
    • Electrons from the source impinge upon an x-ray anode, causing the emission of x-ray radiation toward the window.
    Synonyms
    strike, hit, dash against, collide with

Derivatives

impingement

noun
More example sentences
  • This recognition of a void created an identity with real impingements upon it.
  • It may take four to 40 minutes, depending on the severity of the disc impingement on the nerve root in the spine, but the back pain may be persistent.
  • We are a freedom-loving country and a ban would be an impingement of freedom.

impinger

noun

Origin

mid 16th century: from Latin impingere 'drive something in or at', from in- 'into' + pangere 'fix, drive'. The word originally meant 'thrust at forcibly', then 'come into forcible contact'; hence 'encroach' (mid 18th century).

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