Definition of impressionistic in English:

impressionistic

Line breaks: im|pres¦sion|is¦tic
Pronunciation: /ɪmˌprɛʃəˈnɪstɪk
 
/

adjective

1Based on subjective reactions presented unsystematically: a personal and impressionistic view of the war
More example sentences
  • Washington runs on statistics, but most Americans operate based on more impressionistic judgments.
  • Quantitative researchers sometimes criticize qualitative research as being too impressionistic and subjective.
  • The former is subjective and impressionistic; the latter can be itemised, weighed, measured, or examined down the microscope.
2In the style of impressionism: an impressionistic portrait
More example sentences
  • Others followed - including artists of the Symbolist, Art Nouveau and Impressionistic styles who used the flame as a means for creative expression.
  • Stevens also painted seascapes and coastal scenes in a more Impressionistic style similar to that of Boudin and Jongkind.
  • In a market where a ‘minor Monet’ fetches $28 million, many of today's artists who paint in the Impressionistic style benefit from the appeal of the original masters' art and enjoy commercial success for their own works.

Derivatives

impressionistically

adverb
More example sentences
  • The photographs-typical, odd, hypnotizing - were impressionistically combined with fragmentary recordings of conversations among people flipping through their own family albums.
  • Within this framework the essays move impressionistically back and forth with little attention to, or interest in, specific chronology.
  • The total population of England in 1600 was probably fairly close to 4.1 million (and Scotland, Ireland, and Wales, much more impressionistically, 1.9 million).

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