Definition of improvise in English:

improvise

Line breaks: im¦pro|vise
Pronunciation: /ˈɪmprəvʌɪz
 
/

verb

[with object]

Derivatives

improvisatory

Pronunciation: /-ˈzeɪt(ə)ri/
adjective
More example sentences
  • His performances were often freely given late at night, off-the-cuff, with an improvisatory air.
  • When she is ready to begin, it begins; the process is spontaneous and improvisatory.
  • There is scarcely a single field in music that has remained unaffected by improvisation, scarcely a single musical technique or form of composition that did not originate in improvisatory practice.

improviser

noun
More example sentences
  • From 1974 until about 1990, a large part of my compositional time was spent devising music for improvisers, what I now call ‘game pieces.’
  • San Francisco's Mimi Fox will discuss and demonstrate her guitar style while Chicago's Wheatbread Johnson will invite beginners and improvisers to play around with Chicago blues.
  • The improvisers must be quick of thought, but also high in energy; they must remain on high alert for hours, allowing them to react with some confidence and, hopefully, some humour.

Origin

early 19th century (earlier (late 18th century) as improvisation): from French improviser or its source, Italian improvvisare, from improvviso 'extempore', from Latin improvisus 'unforeseen', based on provisus, past participle of providere 'make preparation for'.

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