Definition of inalienable in English:

inalienable

Line breaks: in|ali¦en|able
Pronunciation: /ɪnˈeɪlɪənəb(ə)l
 
/

adjective

Derivatives

inalienability

Pronunciation: /-ˈbɪlɪti/
noun
More example sentences
  • Seeking to shield peasants from the disruptions of the spread of capitalist relations, co-operators successfully opposed the repeal of laws on inalienability of land.
  • If any political lesson emerges from these shifting allegiances, we might consider the true inalienability of certain human rights.
  • Finally, Fama and Jensen suggest that the residual claims of professional partnerships are characterized by flexible sharing rules, inalienability and limited horizons.

inalienably

adverb
More example sentences
  • Referentially deficient subjects are of many types, the most common of which includes inanimate subjects (such as inalienably possessed subjects and weather subjects), expletive subjects, and subjects of the passive construction.
  • The rendering of Shakespeare texts into another language is inalienably part of the process whereby Shakespeare has been, and is being, received in non-English-speaking countries.
  • It is only because he is convinced that evolutionary science is married inalienably to materialist belief, that he wants me to explain how Darwinian biology can be compatible with theology.

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