Definition of incise in English:

incise

Line breaks: in¦cise
Pronunciation: /ɪnˈsʌɪz
 
/

verb

[with object]
  • 1Mark or decorate (an object or surface) with a cut or cuts: a button incised with a skull
    More example sentences
    • The chip-carved and incised surfaces of the three-dimensional pieces are filled in with crayon, as are the irregular patterns of geometric shapes in the drawings, which shine with a colorful waxy patina.
    • Heech Tablet, melding architectural form and geometric abstraction, extends this conceit using a bronze slab whose surface is incised with rows of small rectangles meant to evoke a cuneiform inscription.
    • The surface is incised by the major rivers and their tributaries and is therefore not continuous across the entire region.
  • 1.1Cut (a mark or decoration) into a surface: figures incised on upright stones
    More example sentences
    • He or she carefully incises this mark with a knife blade or scissors to expose the underlying fascia covering the intrinsic laryngeal musculature.
    • It is attributed to Joseph Henry Remmey, who is known for similar elaborately incised cobalt blue decoration, especially of stylized birds.
    • Funnily enough the answer is incised in stone in the bas-reliefs that line the lower walls of the vast, ancient Khmer temple of Angkor Wat.
    Synonyms
  • 1.2Cut (skin or flesh) with a surgical instrument: the wound was incised and drained
    More example sentences
    • Since the 1960s, evidence has indicated that antimicrobials administered shortly before the skin is incised can prevent surgical site infections.
    • The desired outcome was based on the surgeon's ability to manipulate a cryolathe, which is an instrument designed to incise tissue linearly.
    • This approach involves incising the skin and subcutaneous tissue overlying the sternum, sawing longitudinally through the manubrium, body, and xiphoid process of the sternum, and cutting into the pericardial sacs.
    Synonyms
    cut, cut into, make an incision in, slit, slit open, lance; gash, slash

Origin

mid 16th century: from French inciser, from Latin incis- 'cut into, engraved', from the verb incidere, from in- 'into' + caedere 'to cut'.

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