Definition of inclusive in English:

inclusive

Line breaks: in¦clu|sive
Pronunciation: /ɪnˈkluːsɪv
 
/

adjective

  • 1Including all the services or items normally expected or required: menus stating fully inclusive prices
    More example sentences
    • Although the cost of such an exclusive safari might seem prohibitive, it is worth pointing out that everything - from wine, beer and spirits to the daily laundry service - is inclusive.
    • Costing €555 all inclusive it is expected that there will be great demand for seats, so it would be advisable to make reservations as soon as possible.
    • There is a great demand for ‘mini movers,’ those companies that offer the same inclusive services for very small relocations.
    Synonyms
  • 1.1 (inclusive of) Containing (a specified element) as part of a whole: all prices are inclusive of VAT
    More example sentences
    • Both prices are inclusive of a meal plus five team prizes along with individual, front nine and back nine prizes.
    • The announcement would not be affected by any management buy-out, because the recent jobs announcement was inclusive of the decision.
    • Prices range from £205 to £395 per room per night, inclusive of continental breakfast and VAT.
    Synonyms
  • 1.2 [postpositive] Including the limits specified: between the ages of 55 and 59 inclusive
    More example sentences
    • The offer is available until mid-December and is limited from Sundays to Thursdays inclusive.
  • 1.3Not excluding any section of society or any party involved in something: only an inclusive peace process will end the conflict
    More example sentences
    • They say it is an attempt to recognise some of their past failings and move towards a more inclusive party, which recognises some of the diversity in society.
    • The Green Party's fundamental values lead us to promote an inclusive society.
    • But instead of it being inclusive, they excluded her, and I think that we, as women, those who have been brought up in Christianity, have been trying to work through that for 2,000 years.
  • 1.4(Of language) deliberately avoiding usages that could be seen as excluding a particular social group, for example avoiding the use of masculine pronouns to cover both men and women.
    More example sentences
    • Coming from the United Trades and Labour Council, we'd been through the battles of using non-sexist and inclusive language.
    • For example, the publication guidelines of the American Psychological Association stress the use of nonsexist, inclusive language.
    • The new inclusive language and nongendered understanding of God, for example, are rooted in the dissent of feminists from traditional Catholic norms.

Derivatives

inclusively

adverb
More example sentences
  • There's two ways to look at this, competitively, or inclusively.
  • The school has an active anti-bullying policy in place and is confident that it deals fully and inclusively with any issues that may arise.
  • This inevitably leads to some accusing the advertiser of tokenism or stereotyping, which in turn reinforces the difficulty of acting inclusively.

inclusiveness

noun
More example sentences
  • Thus unity and sense of inclusiveness can be promoted only by promoting the spirit of dialogue and spirit of tolerance.
  • Even our efforts at fighting corruption will be in vain if we are not holistic in our approach by ingraining inclusiveness and merit in government action.
  • This rather makes a mockery of our supposed United Kingdom, proud of our inclusiveness, and the fact we are all British irrespective of race, colour or creed.

inclusivity

noun
More example sentences
  • Rejecting terminological inclusivity as unnecessary frees us to accept a pragmatic understanding of the working-class.
  • It's about raising bigger questions of diversity and inclusivity that haven't been raised.
  • For example, are the worries I mentioned here, and alluded to in the comments to another of my posts about the believability of the Party's conversion to a policy of inclusivity to be ignored?

Origin

late 16th century: from medieval Latin inclusivus, from Latin includere (see include).

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