Definition of indefatigable in English:

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indefatigable

Pronunciation: /ˌɪndɪˈfatɪɡəb(ə)l/

adjective

(Of a person or their efforts) persisting tirelessly: an indefatigable defender of human rights
More example sentences
  • He was indefatigable in his industry and sense of curiosity.
  • But he was just indefatigable when it came to his relationships with women.
  • He's indefatigable, like the sides he puts on the park.
Synonyms
tireless, untiring, never-tiring, unwearied, unwearying, unflagging;
energetic, dynamic, enthusiastic;
unrelenting, relentless, unremitting, unswerving, unfaltering, unshakeable, indomitable;
persistent, tenacious, determined, dogged, single-minded, assiduous, industrious

Derivatives

indefatigability

Pronunciation: /ˌɪndɪfatɪɡəˈbɪlɪti/
noun
Example sentences
  • Their courage, strength and indefatigability.
  • Yet somehow by the end, there's room for forgiveness and hope and and endorsement of the indefatigability of the human spirit.
  • The originality, the indefatigability, the uncanny sense of self-promotion, the converting of art into sensibility, put him, it seems to me, into the most rarefied circle.

indefatigably

Pronunciation: /ˌɪndɪˈfatɪɡəbli/
adverb
Example sentences
  • The spirit of industrialism, which is indefatigably active in the development of trade relations, undermines the warlike spirit.
  • He was all kinds of an artist - poet, sculptor, architect, painter - and although he worked with the irregularity of true genius, he worked indefatigably when once he began.
  • She is the dinner guest every hostess covets, the indefatigably charming conversation partner who, no matter how obscure the topic, keeps things going.

Origin

Early 17th century: from French, or from Latin indefatigabilis, from in- 'not' + de- 'away, completely' + fatigare 'wear out'.

More
  • fatigue from mid 17th century:

    The early use of the word was to mean ‘a task or duty causing weariness’; this is seen in the military use of the plural fatigues, duties sometimes allocated as a punishment. It comes via French from Latin fatigare ‘tire out’. The opposite is found in indefatigable (early 17th century).

For editors and proofreaders

Line breaks: in|defat¦ig|able

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