Definition of ineffectual in English:

ineffectual

Line breaks: in|ef¦fec|tual
Pronunciation: /ɪnɪˈfɛktʃʊəl
 
, -tjʊəl/

adjective

Derivatives

ineffectuality

Pronunciation: /-tʃʊˈalɪti/
noun
More example sentences
  • Franklin's civilised demeanour is revealed as mere ineffectuality, and he is unable to save the murdered girl, whom he loves.
  • It's an invitation to cronyism and corruption or total ineffectuality.
  • In much the same manner, Bernard's efforts to keep his experiment with the children under wraps remain equally doomed to ineffectuality.

ineffectually

adverb
More example sentences
  • I spent the day in a deep funk, ineffectually shuffling around my office in an unproductive, sleep-deprived, hangover-tinged haze.
  • Orangutans, gorillas, and their ape relatives, meanwhile, will ineffectually thrash around in deep water or simply gurgle and sink.
  • I spend the night with Polish engineers and local salmon-filleters, collecting anecdotes and dancing ineffectually with someone's giddy aunt.

ineffectualness

noun
More example sentences
  • ‘Experts’, often combining ineffectualness with insufferable vanity, have displaced wisdom from its central role.
  • His words - and his ineffectualness - haunted him on Sunday night as the frenzy grew even fiercer.
  • The work is no grandiose masterpiece of self-aware ineffectualness, but the film rides its lead performance and unusual pacing to the umpteenth degree.

Origin

late Middle English: from medieval Latin ineffectualis, from in- 'not' + effectualis, from Latin effectus (see effect); in later use from in-1 'not' + effectual.

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grotesque quality or grotesque things collectively