Definition of infallible in English:

infallible

Line breaks: in|fal¦lible
Pronunciation: /ɪnˈfalɪb(ə)l
 
/

adjective

1Incapable of making mistakes or being wrong: doctors are not infallible
More example sentences
  • Politicians must present themselves as infallible, incorruptible, incapable of dishonesty.
  • During the rest of the series, Trescothick has been infallible, and his reliability at first slip has improved England's out-cricket hugely.
  • It wasn't an altruistic thing at all, but she did believe deep in her heart that an infallible God, a God that would never steer her wrong, was telling her, requiring her to do that.
Synonyms
unerring, error-free, unfailing, faultless, flawless, impeccable, perfect, true, uncanny, precise, accurate, meticulous, scrupulous
British informal spot on
North American informal on the money
1.1Never failing; always effective: infallible cures
More example sentences
  • That we have no infallible technique does not mean that we are bound always to fail.
  • Price is not always an infallible guide to quality, though you would be very unlucky to find a poor-quality vintage champagne costing more than £40 a bottle.
  • I don't wish to trivialise a potentially fatal disease but received wisdom isn't always infallible, not even received medical wisdom.
Synonyms
unfailing, never failing, always effective, guaranteed, dependable, trustworthy, reliable, sure, certain, safe, sound, tried and tested, foolproof, effective, efficacious
informal sure-fire
1.2(In the Roman Catholic Church) credited with papal infallibility: for an encyclical to be infallible the Pope must speak ex cathedra
More example sentences
  • The council's careful balancing of papal and episcopal authority did not seem intended to expand the church's infallible teaching to areas like contraception.
  • The church has proclaimed as infallible two dogmas in relation to Mary - the Immaculate Conception and the Assumption.
  • Unlike church dogma, encyclicals are not infallible pronouncements, but Catholics are expected to follow them, while the declaration of the papal view limits the freedom of theological discussion.

Origin

late 15th century: from French infaillible or late Latin infallibilis, from in- 'not' + Latin fallere 'deceive'.

Derivatives

infallibly

adverb
More example sentences
  • The students, always and infallibly observant of teachers' shortcomings, managed to ask her a few worried questions.
  • Healing always takes place, infallibly, one hundred percent of the time.
  • To repeat this indefinitely, infallibly, would be to divorce the method from the context which gives it meaning.

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