Definition of inference in English:

inference

Line breaks: in¦fer|ence
Pronunciation: /ˈɪnf(ə)r(ə)ns
 
/

noun

Derivatives

inferential

Pronunciation: /-ˈrɛnʃ(ə)l/
adjective
More example sentences
  • Its main contribution was an epistemological method, based on inferential reasoning.
  • The inferential reasoning for tendency or coincidence evidence is considered dangerous as it permits a person to be judged by their conduct on other occasions.
  • Earth, however, has become so modified during its geological history that we cannot use this inferential method to reconstruct the initial state of our own planet.

inferentially

Pronunciation: /-ˈrɛnʃ(ə)li/
adverb
More example sentences
  • Certainly, inferentially, his family can testify about certain things and answer certain questions.
  • Notice also that an inferentially justified belief need not have been arrived at through inference, though it often will have been.
  • A party appearing before a tribunal is entitled to know, either expressly stated by it or inferentially stated, what it is to which the tribunal is addressing its mind.

Origin

late 16th century: from medieval Latin inferentia, from inferent- 'bringing in', from the verb inferre (see infer).

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