Definition of inquisitor in English:

inquisitor

Line breaks: in|quisi|tor
Pronunciation: /ɪnˈkwɪzɪtə
 
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noun

1A person making an inquiry, especially one seen to be excessively harsh or searching: the professional inquisitors of the press
More example sentences
  • He jokes casually with old acquaintances and tackles each question head on, his bright brown eyes searching the faces of his inquisitors.
  • For these kindly inquisitors, all romantic beginnings set the full context for everything that followed (never mind what really happened as the couple came to truly know each other).
  • I'm also surprised at how confident my inquisitors are that I will naturally have to slam the President, which is the prospect the left seems to be anticipating with some glee.
1.1 historical An officer of the Inquisition.
More example sentences
  • With almost no more native and very few foreign Protestants to prosecute, inquisitors began to target other sorts of religious 'deviants'.
  • Having heard their confessions, the inquisitor could impose a penance or punishment, which ranged from wearing yellow crosses to indicate that a witness had been guilty of heretical activities, to being burned alive at the stake.
  • Theologians and inquisitors attributed these offenses to the devil's work, to which socially marginal, uneducated women were seen as especially susceptible.

Origin

late Middle English: from French inquisiteur, from Latin inquisitor, from the verb inquirere (see enquire).

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