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into

Line breaks: into
Pronunciation: /ˈɪntʊ
 
, ˈɪntə
 
/

Definition of into in English:

preposition

1Expressing movement or action with the result that someone or something becomes enclosed or surrounded by something else: cover the bowl and put it into the fridge Sara got into her car and shut the door
More example sentences
  • The first thing that strikes you when you walk through the door into the cafe is the charming decor.
  • She also said that she missed being able to walk out and jump into the swimming pool at her house.
  • The conman stepped into the hall saying he was from the police and walked straight into the living room.
2Expressing movement or action with the result that someone or something makes physical contact with something else: he crashed into a parked car
More example sentences
  • Their call for action follows an incident last weekend where a car crashed into the wall of a house.
  • A woman had a lucky escape when a car crashed into her kitchen just a few feet from where she was sitting.
  • A young couple living in one of the cottages were asleep when the car crashed into their home.
3Indicating a route by which someone or something may arrive at a particular destination: the narrow road which led down into the village
More example sentences
  • His skill was in caricatures, a route which led him into a career as a political cartoonist.
  • One route into the industry is to become a camera trainee on a feature film.
  • However the journey times of routes into London from the North, East and South all fell.
4Indicating the direction towards which someone or something is turned when confronting something else: with the wind blowing into your face sobbing into her skirt
More example sentences
  • I decided to start off mid way down the left bank with a wind blowing into my face.
  • My tackle tends to be much heavier than in Summer as I often have a wind blowing into my face.
  • The waves rolled towards the beach, as the dusty winds blew wild sands into the air.
5Indicating an object of attention or interest: a clearer insight into what is involved an inquiry into the squad’s practices
More example sentences
  • It was an interesting insight into the debate as to why Kiwi teams are able to make the whole add up to more than the sum of its parts.
  • Great stuff, and an interesting insight into the Edwardian England of his youth.
  • It's an interesting insight into what it was like to live and blog in that police state.
6Expressing a change of state: a peaceful protest which turned into a violent confrontation the fruit can be made into jam
More example sentences
  • The food grows so well here that Robyn has plans to turn the surfeit into jams and pickles to sell from the Cascina.
  • Vegetables are dried or pickled and fruits are also dried, candied, or made into jams.
  • People turn into snails and violent and gruesome deaths seem to be the only way to escape the grisly vortex.
7Expressing the result of an action: they forced the club into a humiliating special general meeting
More example sentences
  • This is where a manager uses all sorts of subterfuge to entice a player into leaving his present club.
  • Some are genuinely injured, while others are cowed into submission by their clubs.
  • While we were in France, we were tricking her into walking the odd step on her own.
8Expressing division: three into twelve goes four
More example sentences
  • In the event of victory, the two agreed to the division of the peninsula into four states.
  • Equal tempering is a system for breaking up each octave into twelve equal semi-tones.
  • If enough teams apply, the second division will be split into a Conference North and South.
9 informal (Of a person) taking a lively and active interest in (something): he’s into surfing and jet-skiing

Origin

Old English intō (see in, to).

Words that rhyme with into

thereinto

Definition of into in:

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