Definition of inviolate in English:

inviolate

Line breaks: in|viol|ate
Pronunciation: /ɪnˈvʌɪələt
 
/

adjective

Free or safe from injury or violation: an international memorial which must remain inviolate
More example sentences
  • Others, including censorship watchdogs, believe that free speech is not inviolate irrespective of what is said or sung, and that there is such a thing as the abuse of free speech.
  • For the last few years Howard's entire political program has been based on the premise that Australia's sovereignty is not only absolute but inviolate, untouchable, a veritable law of nature.
  • The two instead experience a ‘precious, inviolate, and genuine’ relationship free from the burdens of racial representation.
Synonyms

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin inviolatus, from in- 'not' + violare 'violate'.

Derivatives

inviolacy

noun
More example sentences
  • This duty to protect the individual's right to bodily inviolacy arises explicitly from the international law of human rights and the Children's Convention.
  • The right of life and inviolacy are basic rights of man.

inviolately

adverb
More example sentences
  • Death is not a certainty because you can't prove inviolately that it exists.
  • vow, with the powerful assistance of God, to clearly, faithfully, and inviolately stay true to the Church's dogmas, doctrines, precepts, and laws until I breathe my last breath.

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