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jump-start

Line breaks: jump-start

Definition of jump-start in English:

verb

[with object]
1Start (a car with a flat battery) with jump leads or by a sudden release of the clutch while the car is being pushed: he jump-started his old Chrysler
More example sentences
  • Have you ever been able to jump-start a car that seemed to crank OK but wouldn't start on its own?
  • A surprising number of optic injuries are caused by bungee cords, sparks from using tools or jump-starting a car, or from flying champagne corks.
  • He was actually really nice, the way he offered to try to jump-start the car.
1.1Give an added impetus to (something that is proceeding slowly or is at a standstill): she suggests ways to jump-start the sluggish educational system
More example sentences
  • These writers do not present the only way to jump-start our sluggish sense of wonder.
  • The terrorist attack blew a gaping hole in that landscape, but nothing else fundamental has changed in the city's economy - which suggests that a vigorous rebuilding would jump-start the area all over again.
  • I hope these suggestions will serve to jump-start the maintenance transformation process and provide a fundamental strategy for rethinking and reengineering Army maintenance.

noun

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1An act of jump-starting a car: a quick jump-start got the jeep running again
More example sentences
  • What you need is a jump-start, a spark that will get your motor running and take you from zero to 60 as fast as possible.
  • He asked if the guys could give him a jump-start.
  • Fuel deliveries and jump-starts also fall into this category.
1.1An added impetus: the stimulus package is intended to give the economy a jump-start
More example sentences
  • And they all more or less got their jump-start as a result of the Native Federation of Alberta.
  • Proponents of the reform said it was needed to put the postal saving system's massive deposits into the hands of private investors and provide a strong jump-start to the economy.
  • Because the team was so bad, a number of young players got jump-starts on their careers.

Definition of jump-start in:

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Pronunciation: ˈtɛnɪbrəs
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