There are 5 definitions of kip in English:

kip1

Line breaks: kip
Pronunciation: /kɪp
 
/

noun

1(In leather-making) the hide of a young or small animal.
More example sentences
  • Now with flawless tight grain kip skin leather and the best Pro Patterns, these gloves are sure to be the new industry benchmark.
  • Leather made from kips generally has a fine, tight fibre.
1.1A set or bundle of kips.

Origin

late Middle English: perhaps related to Middle Dutch kip, kijp 'bundle (of hides)'.

Definition of kip in:

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Word of the day abjure
Pronunciation: əbˈdʒʊə
verb
solemnly renounce (a belief, cause, or claim)

There are 5 definitions of kip in English:

kip2

Line breaks: kip
Pronunciation: /kɪp
 
/

noun (plural same or kips)

The basic monetary unit of Laos, equal to 100 ats.
More example sentences
  • Wide fluctuations began in 1998, when the kip was valued at about 6,200 to the U.S. dollar.
  • The value of the kip plummeted from around 800 to the dollar in 1997 to around 7,500 kip to the dollar today (it went over 10,000 at one point).
  • All seven men were also ordered to pay 11 million kip each as compensation to the family of the victim, said the sources.

Origin

Thai.

Definition of kip in:

There are 5 definitions of kip in English:

kip3

Syllabification: kip

Entry from US English dictionary

noun

A unit of weight equal to 1,000 lb (453.6 kg).

Origin

early 20th century: probably from ki- in kilo- + p- in pound1.

Definition of kip in:

There are 5 definitions of kip in English:

kip4

Line breaks: kip
Pronunciation: /kɪp
 
/
informal

noun

1British A sleep or nap: I might have a little kip [mass noun]: he was trying to get some kip
More example sentences
  • Though you've still been on the road for four or five hours to reach the ferry port, your time clock says you are ready for some kip, so you sleep like a baby, arriving before France really wakes up, refreshed and prepared for a long drive.
  • That's one way to get some kip on the plane, leave your child in an airport.
  • Lo and behold out of the surf popped a little critter, and he proceeded to waddle up the beach and then up the banking for a bit of kip.
1.1chiefly Scottish A bed.
More example sentences
  • I think I heard Steven Frail saying there's a virus flooring a lot of the players. Eggert puked this morning and is in his kip!
  • Usually when he arrived home with his ‘AA cronies’, as Mary called them, she'd be in her kip.
2Irish An unpleasant, dirty, or sordid place: he couldn’t get a start in this kip of a city
More example sentences
  • If these reforms go through much of the countryside will go back to being a barren kip.
  • Now the only negative thing was that we stayed the night at the top to see the famed sunrise in the morning but the hotel we stayed at was a kip and I hardly got any sleep.
  • Jaysus, but what a kip it was inside Mack's cottage!

verb (kips, kipping, kipped)

[no object] British Back to top  
Sleep: he can kip on her sofa
More example sentences
  • I was back from Germany for a few weeks and was kipping for a couple of nights on the sofa in the place that my ex-housemates were now sharing with my ex-girlfriend (we're still friendly so it wasn't a problem).
  • Now at this stage I was all for kipping on the floor of the family room, rather than leave my poor, unprotected wife in the hands of evil maternity ward goons.
  • In Japanese style, we just piled into the room and kipped on the floor, no beds, no mats, no nothing.

Origin

mid 18th century (in the sense 'brothel'): perhaps related to Danish kippe 'hovel, tavern'.

Definition of kip in:

There are 5 definitions of kip in English:

kip5

Line breaks: kip
Pronunciation: /kɪp
 
/

noun

(In Australia) a small piece of wood from which coins are spun in the game of two-up.
More example sentences
  • The boxer or manager of the game sat with his coins, kips, string and money tray in the place where he could view the whole ring clearly.
  • Simon placed two coins on the ‘kip’ and flicked them high in the air.

Origin

late 19th century: perhaps related to Irish cipin 'small stick, dibble'.

Definition of kip in: