There are 2 definitions of knock on in English:

knock on1

1 informal Grow old: she’s knocking on a bit
More example sentences
  • Henning was always a great defender, even when he was knocking on a bit.
  • He's a hard-bitten, funny character who admits that he's knocking on.
2 (also knock the ball on) Rugby Illegally drive the ball with the hand or arm towards the opponents' goal line.
More example sentences
  • Chris Spencer drove through the Elland defence but was judged to have knocked on after crossing the line.
  • Neil Back escaped with a warning after deliberately knocking the ball on, just out of Burke's penalty reach.
  • Rugby is a free flowing game and the play will only stop when somebody knocks the ball on or gives away a penalty.
See parent entry: knock

Definition of knock on in:

Get more from Oxford Dictionaries

Subscribe to remove adverts and access premium resources

Word of the day flippant
Pronunciation: ˈflɪp(ə)nt
adjective
not showing a serious or respectful attitude

There are 2 definitions of knock on in English:

knock-on2

Line breaks: knock-on

noun

1 [usually as modifier] chiefly British A secondary, indirect, or cumulative effect: movements in oil prices have knock-on effects on other fuels
More example sentences
  • The knock-on effect of increased fuel prices may eventually trickle down to everything from the price of milk and a loaf of bread to the clothes we wear.
  • Many employees have seen a big drop in remuneration packages during the downturn which has had a knock-on effect on house prices.
  • Closing any road is a drastic step, bringing many unwanted and potentially dangerous knock-on effects.
2 Rugby An act of knocking on, for which a penalty or scrum is awarded to the opposition.
More example sentences
  • As well as giving away needless penalties, Scotland could not capitalise on the 26 mistakes made by the Welsh, many of them knock-ons, forward passes and turnovers.
  • But, as conditions deteriorated, a drizzle giving way to a steady downpour, so did the standard of play with a succession of knock-ons gifting both sides possession.
  • Hennessy and Scott Laird both broke the line on separate occasions but poor passing and knock-ons meant the moves were not completed.