There are 2 main definitions of lade in English:

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lade 1

Pronunciation: /leɪd/

verb (past participle laden /ˈleɪd(ə)n/)

[with object] archaic
1Put cargo on board (a ship).
Example sentences
  • Slyly, he let it be known that Elissa was working on his behalf and he put her in charge of lading the boats.
1.1Ship (goods) as cargo: the surplus products must be laden on board the vessels
More example sentences
  • Mahabir said he returned to India when the rice was shipped and brought back samples of what had been laded.
1.2 [no object] (Of a ship) take on cargo: vessels lade there

Origin

Old English hladan, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch and German laden 'to load', also to ladle and perhaps to lathe.

Words that rhyme with lade

abrade, afraid, aid, aide, ambuscade, arcade, balustrade, barricade, Belgrade, blade, blockade, braid, brigade, brocade, cannonade, carronade, cascade, cavalcade, cockade, colonnade, crusade, dissuade, downgrade, enfilade, esplanade, evade, fade, fusillade, glade, grade, grenade, grillade, handmade, harlequinade, homemade, invade, jade, laid, lemonade, limeade, made, maid, man-made, marinade, masquerade, newlaid, orangeade, paid, palisade, parade, pasquinade, persuade, pervade, raid, serenade, shade, Sinéad, staid, stockade, stock-in-trade, suede, tailor-made, they'd, tirade, trade, Ubaid, underpaid, undismayed, unplayed, unsprayed, unswayed, upbraid, upgrade, wade
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There are 2 main definitions of lade in English:

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lade 2

Pronunciation: /leɪd/

noun

Scottish
A channel constructed to carry the swift current of water that drives a mill wheel: a lade from off the Tarland Burn
More example sentences
  • It is a delightful small country house with cottage, paddock, and original mill lade, dating from about 1830.
  • The photograph shows an islander standing in the lade that channels water from the adjacent burn into the waterwheel below.
  • The mills embarked on a modernisation programme that included the building of a new hydro-electric scheme, widening of the lade, and a modern power plant.

Origin

Early 17th century (in the sense 'watercourse, mouth of a river'): probably a variation of lead1; perhaps confused with lade, the Scots and Northern form of lode.

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