There are 3 definitions of lag in English:

lag1

Line breaks: lag

verb (lags, lagging, lagged)

[no object]

noun

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  • 1 (also time lag) A period of time between one event and another: a time lag between infection and symptoms
    More example sentences
    • Back in the old days, the time lag was considerably longer.
    • And yes, there is a time lag of several days before new entries appear.
    • The latter depends critically on the time lag between environmental change and biotic responses to that environmental change.
  • 2 Physics A retardation in an electric current or movement.
    More example sentences
    • With a longitudinal bias field, there was a lag of about 3.5 ns as the magnetization responded to the switching pulse.

Derivatives

lagger

noun

Origin

early 16th century (as a noun in the sense 'hindmost person in a game, race, etc.', also 'dregs'): related to the dialect adjective lag (perhaps from a fanciful distortion of last1, or of Scandinavian origin: compare with Norwegian dialect lagga 'go slowly').

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Word of the day coloratura
Pronunciation: ˌkɒlərəˈtjʊərə
noun
elaborate ornamentation of a vocal melody

There are 3 definitions of lag in English:

lag2

Line breaks: lag

verb (lags, lagging, lagged)

[with object]
  • Enclose or cover (a boiler, pipes, etc.) with material that provides heat insulation: all pipes and tanks in the attic should be lagged (as adjective lagged) a lagged hot-water tank
    More example sentences
    • And why is there no mention of the historical significance of asbestos insulation used to lag the steam boilers?
    • You can fit a three-inch insulating jacket and lag the pipes for as little as £10.
    • They advise checking, and lagging all exposed pipes, keeping buildings heated and draining exposed pipes.

Derivatives

lagger

noun
More example sentences
  • My job involved preparing the scaffolding and boards that laggers used when replacing old asbestos.
  • I have it very much in mind that Mr Machin and Mr Stages were described by counsel for the employers as peripatetic laggers working at such sites as were available.
  • I also worked close to laggers and scalers who were knocking asbestos lagging off; they were employed by Harland & Wolff.

Origin

late 19th century: from earlier lag 'piece of insulating cover'.

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There are 3 definitions of lag in English:

lag3

Line breaks: lag
British informal

noun

  • A person who has been frequently convicted and sent to prison: both old lags were sentenced to ten years' imprisonment
    More example sentences
    • It is partly because of old lags enjoying favours from prison officers that the murderer is at large, four other men having been wrongly convicted.
    • Operational reasons, old lags will recall, is British policespeak for ‘I'm not going to tell you,’ while one million is policespeak for two million.
    • It matters not one jot that old lags like Spedding, the great Paul Thompson and producer Rhett Davies are along for the ride.

verb (lags, lagging, lagged)

[with object] archaic Back to top  
  • Arrest or send to prison: they were nearly lagged by the constables

Origin

late 16th century (as a verb in the sense 'carry off, steal'): of unknown origin. Current senses date from the 19th century.

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Definition of lag in: