Definition of Latinize in English:

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Latinize

Pronunciation: /ˈlatɪnʌɪz/
(also Latinise)

verb

[with object]
1Give a Latin or Latinate form to (a word): his name was Latinized into Confucius
More example sentences
  • I'm not quite sure why he felt the need to Latinise the names of his fallacies but I suspect it put more people off reading the article than it encouraged.
  • Colchester, whose name was now Latinized to Camulodunum, became the site of a substantial fortress for the Twentieth Legion.
  • The shortened, Latinised version of his name became Sancte Claus, which led to the obvious name of Santa Claus.
1.1 archaic Translate into Latin: he had a hand in Latinizing that book
1.2 [no object] archaic Use Latin forms or idiom: she Latinizes less in the poems that follow
2Make (a people) conform to the ideas and customs of the ancient Romans, the Latin peoples, or the Latin Church.
Example sentences
  • It was the winter of rebellion as the Marthomite Christians decided to resist what they called attempts to ‘Latinise’ the church in Kerala.
  • Latin Americans don't want to Latinize the United States - they want to Americanize their own countries.
  • Jupiter promises to add the Teucrian rituals and mores, but to Latinize them.

Derivatives

Latinization

Pronunciation: /latɪnʌɪˈzeɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
Example sentences
  • Not only are Hispanics transforming the United States in a process of Latinization, but also Latinos are being transformed by the United States in a process of Americanization.
  • We are going through a process of Latinization.
  • The fact that South Americans now do the work is part of a larger phenomenon, the Latinization of the American West.

Latinizer

noun
Example sentences
  • Though Johnson is said to be the great Latinizer of English, English never did get Latinized.
  • And the Apostles Methodius and Cyril, Greeks by origin, but in communication with Rome, are claimed, wrongly, by the Latinisers as their own.
  • As for the Latinisers, a curse on them and their fruits - the ‘b’ in doubt and debt, the ‘s’ in island.

Origin

Late 16th century: from late Latin Latinizare, from Latin Latinus (see Latin).

For editors and proofreaders

Line breaks: Lat¦in|ize

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