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latitudinarian

Line breaks: lati|tu¦din|ar¦ian
Pronunciation: /ˌlatɪtjuːdɪˈnɛːrɪən
 
/

Definition of latitudinarian in English:

adjective

Allowing latitude in religion; showing no preference among varying creeds and forms of worship: the latitudinarian clergy of the established Church
More example sentences
  • Surges of fashionable liberalism such as latitudinarian complacency in the early part of the century drew the fire of much satirical scepticism.
  • Like their English counterparts, American latitudinarian Anglicans, such as Alexander Garden, also shaped Enlightened Dissent.
  • In specifying severe judgment, as is widely recommended, are the bishops engaged in a form of retribution for having erred in the past by latitudinarian excess?

noun

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A person with a latitudinarian attitude.
Example sentences
  • Wishy-washy latitudinarians that we are, the editors emphasize that each group is independent and works out whatever works best for participants.
  • It is a commonplace to associate the low view of the episcopate not only with latitudinarians, but also with nineteenth-century evangelicals.
  • However, the writings of latitudinarians Tillotson, Stillingfleet, and Wilkins received the most accolades.

Origin

mid 17th century: from Latin latitudo 'breadth' (see latitude) + -arian. The term was first applied in a derogatory sense to more liberal and tolerant Anglican clerics.

Derivatives

latitudinarianism

1
noun
Example sentences
  • Actually, some figures of the period, such as Hans Denck and Sebastian Franck, did; but latitudinarianism was itself regarded as a heresy.
  • The latitudinarianism of the incumbent rabbi was attuned to the religious outlook of the congregation's membership, for whom Orthodoxy was a matter of preference, not of practice.
  • He spurns the label of ‘laxity’ for latitudinarianism and defends Anglicanism as a venerable bulwark against the encroachments and excesses of Rome.

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