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lead-in

Line breaks: lead-in
Pronunciation: /ˈliːdɪn
 
/

Definition of lead-in in English:

noun

1An introduction or preamble which allows one to move smoothly on to the next part of something: [as modifier]: the lead-in note
More example sentences
  • The longer-than-expected lead-in time will allow employers time to prepare for the full implementation of the regulations.
  • Some of the lead-in chapter introductions are very well done - I particularly liked the one on Organizational Transformation.
  • The lead-in time would allow directors bring themselves up to speed on the requirements of the bill.
2A wire leading in from outside, especially from an aerial to a receiver or transmitter.
Example sentences
  • I should also recommend looking for any ‘holes’ or cracks in the outside to inside transition zones in your home - the trim around doors and windows, door sills, antenna lead-ins, etc.
  • Generally, the sliding strips are flush with an edge of the glazing and they project into the interior of the glazing beyond the power lead-ins by at least about 5 millimeters.
  • When passing an electrical conductor through a conducting panel at high voltages, our hollow pair lead-ins provide optimum insulation and strength.

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