There are 2 definitions of ley in English:

ley1

Line breaks: ley
Pronunciation: /leɪ
 
/
(also temporary ley)

noun

  • A piece of land put down to grass, clover, etc., for a single season or a limited number of years, in contrast to permanent pasture.
    More example sentences
    • The farm is down to clover leys for grazing and silage plus oats, wheat and beans for feeding out of parlour in a total mixed ration, with all cows receiving the same amount of feed.
    • The sheep and cattle all run together on swards, which are predominately white clover mixtures, and Howard told me that the mixed stocking and the highly nutritious clover leys have a big bearing on the way his livestock thrive.
    • Housing, feeding and slurry facilities were already adequate, which freed up spare capital for reseeding fields with clover-rich leys.

Origin

Old English lǣge 'fallow' (recorded in lǣghrycg 'ridge left at the edge of a ploughed field'); related to lay1 and lie1.

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Word of the day astrogation
Pronunciation: ˌastrə(ʊ)ˈgeɪʃ(ə)n
noun
(in science fiction) navigation in outer space

There are 2 definitions of ley in English:

ley2

Line breaks: ley
Pronunciation: /leɪ
 
, liː
 
/
(also ley line)

noun

  • A supposed straight line connecting three or more prehistoric or ancient sites, sometimes regarded as the line of a former track and associated by some with lines of energy and other paranormal phenomena.
    More example sentences
    • Some are new-age mystics convinced that the Christian route to Santiago is just the latest version of a more ancient pathway linking ley line to ley line.
    • The myths include the idea that Oxford Road is built on a ley line and so is believed by some to be an energy centre.
    • Up until about an hour ago I had been the only person I knew who even knew what a ley line was, let alone could actually use them, but the rule still applied.

Origin

1920s: variant of lea.