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lob

Line breaks: lob
Pronunciation: /lɒb
 
/

Definition of lob in English:

verb (lobs, lobbing, lobbed)

[with object and adverbial of direction]
1Throw or hit (a ball or missile) in a high arc: he lobbed the ball over their heads
More example sentences
  • Our leaders seem intent on lobbing cruise missiles like craps dice: gambling that the precise use of unprovoked force will effect peace.
  • We lob cruise missiles and I am not critical of that, but I think that has been the attitude - well they are not going to respond.
  • Suddenly, the green-and-white-clad morons began taunting the Thistle crowd, before lobbing missiles in their direction.
Synonyms
1.1 [with object] (In soccer or tennis) kick or hit the ball over (an opponent) in a high arc: he managed to lob the keeper
More example sentences
  • Nestor made the game safe when he picked up a long ball and cleverly lobbed the Greyhound keeper to make it 4-2.
  • Rooney can do 40-yard passes or he can lob the goalkeeper from 40 yards.
  • Ian Wilson levelled before half-time when he ran on to a through ball to lob the advancing keeper.

noun

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1(In sport) a ball lobbed over an opponent or a stroke producing this result: Federer played a lob and Nadal’s high volley was in the net
More example sentences
  • Within seven minutes of the start Dalglish scored with a lob, striking the ball from the edge of the box without even looking up.
  • May twice scored by sealing his defender, catching a lob from Raymond Felton and converting a layup.
  • His desperate opponent returns a weak shot or a lob, either of which he puts away with careless bravado.
1.1 Cricket A ball bowled with a slow underarm action.
Example sentences
  • WG Grace kept wicket while Lyttelton bowled underarm lobs… and snapped up 4 for 19.
  • The most successful bowler was, in fact, the wicketkeeper - Alfred Lyttelton took 4 for 19, bowling underarm lobs while WG Grace kept wicket.
  • Australia were amassing a huge score (Billy Murdoch had just scored the first Test double-century) when Lyttelton came on to propel his underarm lobs.

Origin

late 16th century (in the senses 'cause or allow to hang heavily' and 'behave like a lout'): from the archaic noun lob 'lout', 'pendulous object', probably from Low German or Dutch (compare with modern Dutch lubbe 'hanging lip'). The current sense dates from the mid 19th century.

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