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logistics

Line breaks: lo¦gis|tics
Pronunciation: /ləˈdʒɪstɪks
 
/

Definition of logistics in English:

plural noun

[treated as singular or plural]
1The detailed organization and implementation of a complex operation: the logistics of a large-scale rock show demand certain necessities
More example sentences
  • Take, for instance this statement in my letter detailing the logistics.
  • A pilot study provides the researcher with experiential logistics from actual procedural implementation.
  • The costs and logistics involved in caring for children under two has meant far fewer places for this age group and a longer wait for young families.
Synonyms
1.1The activity of organizing the movement, equipment, and accommodation of troops.
Example sentences
  • He taught himself about the use of modern artillery, logistics, military organisation and strategy.
  • The ending of the Cold War has had profound effects upon the philosophy of, and approach to, military logistics.
  • The logistics of moving the troops and equipment is not what takes the most time in this process.
1.2The commercial activity of transporting goods to customers: [as modifier]: our fleet vehicle management system enables logistics firms to track deliveries using satellite technology
More example sentences
  • The second challenge is associated with the need to maximize the total capacity of the transport and logistics business through performance capability.
  • After five years, he had managed to negotiate a merger with another transport and logistics group, Ocean.
  • It houses customer service, logistics, storage, administration, accounts and support for online sales and enquiries.

Origin

late 19th century: from French logistique, from loger 'to lodge'.

More
  • lobby from (mid 16th century):

    Both lobby and lodge (Middle English) go back to medieval Latin lobia ‘covered walk, portico’. The earliest uses of the word refer to monastic cloisters, but after Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries it moved into the world of the rich subjects who turned them into houses. A lobby became an antechamber or entrance hall, and is now often the foyer ( see focus) of a hotel. The British Houses of Parliament, and other parliaments, have a central lobby where MPs can meet constituents and members of pressure groups, and two division lobbies where MPs assemble to vote. To lobby meaning ‘to try to influence a legislator’ originated from this arrangement in the USA. Logistics (late 19th century), originally the supplying of troops, developed in French from lodge.

Definition of logistics in:

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