Definition of lurcher in English:

lurcher

Line breaks: lurch¦er
Pronunciation: /ˈləːtʃə
 
/

noun

1British A cross-bred dog, typically a retriever, collie, or sheepdog crossed with a greyhound, of a kind originally used for hunting and by poachers for catching rabbits.
More example sentences
  • The date is also traditionally the first day of hunting meets and foxhounds, lurchers, greyhounds, beagles, minkhounds, terriers and other hunting dogs will all be taken along to Higham.
  • There will be three rings at the dog show for greyhounds, lurchers, whippets and any other breeds.
  • Some underfeed their whippets, lurchers, or greyhounds, because they mistakenly think these breeds are meant to be stick-thin.
2 archaic A prowler, swindler, or petty thief.
More example sentences
  • In the following months, she went with Ye every afternoon after work to catch lurchers.
  • After a fortnight of failure, a villager reported that the lurcher repeatedly visited one isolated house.
  • Crab, in this case, is played by a somnambulant lurcher called Ria.

Origin

early 16th century (in sense 2): from obsolete lurch 'remain in a place furtively', variant of lurk.

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Pronunciation: ˈhjuːbrɪs
noun
excessive pride or self-confidence