Definition of macadam in English:

macadam

Line breaks: mac|adam
Pronunciation: /məˈkadəm
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
Broken stone of even size, bound with tar or bitumen and used in successively compacted layers for surfacing roads and paths.
More example sentences
  • How good a road is going to be depends on how the design is laid out initially vis-a-vis the layer of bitumen, macadam, coat of slurry seal or fog seal.
  • The dense bitumen macadam surface, in the absence of any other dressing, tends to polish and became dangerous, particularly after rain.
  • In the absence of surface dressing, dense bitumen macadam tends to polish and become dangerous.

Origin

early 19th century: named after John L. McAdam (1756–1836), the British surveyor who advocated using this material.

Derivatives

macadamed

adjective
More example sentences
  • We did lose the trail at one point, when we crossed over the one macadamed road.
  • There is a macadamed road which turns right and heads up to a little parking area right of the road.
  • There is a good macadamed road to the entrance of the village, where there is a meadow for children to play.

Definition of macadam in:

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