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macerate

Line breaks: ma¦cer|ate
Pronunciation: /ˈmasəreɪt
 
/

Definition of macerate in English:

verb

1(Especially with reference to food) soften or become softened by soaking in a liquid: [with object]: macerate the mustard seeds in vinegar [no object]: the fruit was allowed to macerate before fermentation
More example sentences
  • Leaves from adults were macerated with liquid nitrogen and then 75 mg of the tissue was mixed with 375 ml of extraction buffer.
  • Identifying the prey of the giant squid, Achiteuthis dux, is not easy since they finely macerate their food.
  • Infusing, distilling, macerating, deglazing and reducing - all, in one way or another, contribute to the essence of a final product.
Synonyms
pulp, mash, squash, soften, liquefy, soak, steep, infuse
2 [with object] archaic Cause to waste away by fasting: these men lodged in tombs and macerated themselves with fasting
More example sentences
  • She already macerated her poor little body and had resolved never to refuse the requests of the unfortunate.
  • Cancer macerated her body and soul.

Origin

mid 16th century: from Latin macerat- 'made soft, soaked', from macerare 'to soften'.

Derivatives

maceration

1
Pronunciation: /-ˈreɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
Example sentences
  • The Burgundian vogue for cold maceration occasionally calls for refrigeration too.
  • These holes appear to represent tubercles that did not become phosphatized and were dissolved during maceration.
  • Profuse sweating can result in skin maceration and secondary microbial infections.

macerator

2
noun
Example sentences
  • ‘The food macerator recycles liquid as a sort of soup, to avoid the need for fresh water,’ said Sarah.
  • The toilet is flushed and the effluent is discharged by gravity through the rear spigot and into the macerator device.
  • Food Waste is washed through the sink into the Macerator, which then can be discharged to sea.

Words that rhyme with macerate

lacerate

Definition of macerate in:

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