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machinate

Line breaks: ma¦chin|ate
Pronunciation: /ˈmakɪneɪt
 
, ˈmaʃ-/

Definition of machinate in English:

verb

[no object]
Engage in plots; scheme: he machinated against other bishops
More example sentences
  • They have no place machinating behind the scenes now.
  • American cinema has, for years, worked its magic to manipulate popular opinion, machinating to fortify racial stereotypes, prejudice, jingoism, and hegemonic control - especially during times of political change.
  • Focusing on the GCC has given the impression that climate change obstructionism is confined to a handful of goggle-eyed fossil fuel fundamentalists machinating on the margins of respectable corporate society.

Origin

early 16th century: from Latin machinat- 'contrived', from machinari 'contrive', from machina (see machine).

Derivatives

machinator

1
noun
Example sentences
  • The picture could be a physiognomical paradigm of a conspirator, a machinator, a schemer, a Machiavel.
  • This superior adventure, set partly in Prague, involves threatening political machinators, a fearsome golem, and a brave girl who is orchestrating anti-magical resistance.
  • NY1 hears creaking and shouts of eminent domain from Pataki's office, as if he wasn't the visionless machinator behind the whole fiasco.

Definition of machinate in:

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