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magisterial

Line breaks: magis|ter¦ial
Pronunciation: /ˌmadʒɪˈstɪərɪəl
 
/

Definition of magisterial in English:

adjective

1Having or showing great authority: a magisterial pronouncement
More example sentences
  • Possibly only Professor Peter Groenewegen, the author of a magisterial biography of the English economist Alfred Marshall, could surpass him in this.
  • William Randolph Hearst was, as the author of this magisterial study rightly says, a major force in American politics and journalism for half a century.
  • With its deep research, compelling subject, clear analysis, and magisterial yet accessible authorial voice, Black Prisoners and Their World will be a standard point of reference for years to come.
Synonyms
authoritative, masterful, lordly, judgelike
1.1Domineering; dictatorial: he dropped his somewhat magisterial style of questioning
More example sentences
  • Roy Keane, perhaps, at his most magisterial, used to command the midfield and dictate traffic.
  • They are not claiming magisterial authority and bossing other people around.
  • In film after film, the director's misanthropy - the magisterial technique that reduced the actors in his films to stick figures carrying out his bidding - represented the triumph of the mechanical over the human.
Synonyms
2Relating to a magistrate: magisterial districts
More example sentences
  • Instead of being terminated, these pilot projects should be expanded to other magisterial districts.
  • ‘The board wants to give choices to our citizens,’ said Patricia O'Bannon, Tuckahoe magisterial district supervisor on the Henrico County board of supervisors.
  • Port Elizabeth Chief Magistrate Peter Rothman, who oversees 43 magisterial districts, including East London, said representations were being made to the justice department to address the shortfalls.
2.1(Of a person) holding the office of a magistrate: magisterial officers
More example sentences
  • The two parties have each nominated a magisterial candidate but have agreed to cooperate.
  • Hogue shares some of the same goals as other magisterial candidates, citing more jobs and better roads as some primary needs in Casey County.

Origin

early 17th century: from medieval Latin magisterialis, from late Latin magisterius, from Latin magister 'master'.

Derivatives

magisterially

1
adverb
Example sentences
  • Once a glory of craftsmanship, the mighty stones that were so magisterially laid out have been totally upset.
  • In variation 8, chorale texture predominates, though the ground is disrupted by a twelve-note row's magisterially extended cadence into C before it resumes its prescribed course.
  • Around 1650 he turned increasingly to flower painting, in which he established a sombre and magisterially controlled manner that was to dominate Dutch flower painting until the time of van Huysum.

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