There are 2 definitions of mast in English:

mast1

Line breaks: mast
Pronunciation: /mɑːst
 
/

noun

1A tall upright post, spar, or other structure on a ship or boat, in sailing vessels generally carrying a sail or sails.
More example sentences
  • Also in the water were strange vessels, with no masts or sails, built of gunmetal-gray metals that seemed impervious to the rust that had afflicted the dock facilities.
  • She had two masts and carried fore-and-aft auxiliary sails.
  • Before the battle was over the Téméraire was virtually impossible to sail, her masts and rigging having been all but wrecked, but she still managed to keep firing on the enemy.
Synonyms
spar, boom, yard, gaff, foremast, mainmast, topmast, mizzenmast, mizzen, royal mast
archaic stick
1.1A tall upright post on land, especially a flagpole or a television or radio transmitter.
More example sentences
  • The spokeswoman said there was no conclusive evidence that made a link between exposure to radio waves, transmitter masts and long-term public health risks.
  • One of the last battles against police radio masts being put up in the North York Moors national park looks likely to be lost despite continued concerns about the impact on health and the landscape.
  • It is understood the difficulties centre on problems caused by the built-up nature of Greater Manchester and the fact that many masts and transmitters operate at once.
Synonyms
flagpole, flagstaff, pole, post, rod, support, upright; aerial, transmitter, pylon

Origin

Old English mæst, of West Germanic origin; related to Dutch mast and German Mast.

Phrases

before the mast

historical Serving as an ordinary seaman in a sailing ship (quartered in the forecastle): he had sailed before the mast in a windjammer
More example sentences
  • A day to celebrate a great Victory so slipping back to my youthful days before the mast as a boy sailor I will be happy to join in the traditional Naval celebrations.
  • Such is our time before the mast in Tahiti - until departure becomes as inevitable as work and taxes.
  • It is surprising how many men who come from the inland counties have sailed before the mast.

nail (or pin) one's colours to the mast

Declare one’s beliefs or intentions openly: they nailed their colours to the mast of youth revolt
More example sentences
  • I have the chance, finally, to come off the fence and out of the closet, stretch my philosophical wings, nail my colours to the mast, and proudly declare: I am a relativist; je suis un relativiste; ich bin ein Relativist.
  • I think the price probably is a bit of a gamble, but they must be confident because they have nailed their colours to the mast.
  • It might have been better if we hadn't nailed our colours to the mast without being completely happy with them.

Derivatives

masted

adjective
[in combination]: a single-masted fishing boat

Definition of mast in:

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Word of the day antebellum
Pronunciation: ˌantɪˈbɛləm
adjective
occurring or existing before a particular war…

There are 2 definitions of mast in English:

mast2

Line breaks: mast
Pronunciation: /mɑːst
 
/

noun

[mass noun]
The fruit of beech, oak, chestnut, and other forest trees, especially as food for pigs.
More example sentences
  • He explains that the native rats ate many kinds of berries, beech mast, and other wholesome foods of the forest.
  • All sites experienced at least one mast failure, and mast failure years were generally consistent across sites.
  • The first assumption is that mast crops and small mammal populations are synchronized across a wide range.

Origin

Old English mæst, of West Germanic origin; probably related to meat.

Definition of mast in: