There are 3 definitions of mere in English:

mere1

Line breaks: mere
Pronunciation: /mɪə
 
/

adjective

[attributive]
1Used to emphasize how small or insignificant someone or something is: questions that cannot be answered by mere mortals the city is a mere 20 minutes from some stunning countryside
More example sentences
  • On one side, it reduces the people depicted to mere entertainment value, insignificant frogs meant only for visual dissection.
  • They are observed, your Honour, for a number of reasons, some of which may be historical, but basically they are mere insignificant courtesies.
  • ‘I'm open-minded,’ he said, looking down at his shoes, the mere hint of a smile playing on his lips.
Synonyms
trifling, meagre, bare, trivial, paltry, basic, scant, scanty, skimpy, minimal, slender; no more than, just, only
1.1Used to emphasize that the fact of something being present in a situation is enough to influence that situation: his stomach rebelled at the mere thought of food
More example sentences
  • Apart from the fact that his mere presence attracted a crowd of over 24,000, as well as live coverage on ABC television, he didn't make much of an impact on the game.
  • To hold otherwise would be, in effect,… to convict a man on his thoughts, unaccompanied by any physical act other than the fact of his mere presence.
  • The permanent features of our situation seem mere brute facts - to be endured or, if possible, gotten around.

Origin

late Middle English (in the senses 'pure' and 'sheer, downright'): from Latin merus 'undiluted'.

Definition of mere in:

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Pronunciation: ˌsalməˈneɪzə
noun
a wine bottle twelve times the standard size...

There are 3 definitions of mere in English:

mere2

Line breaks: mere
Pronunciation: /mɪə
 
/

noun

British, chiefly literary
A lake or pond: the stream widens into a mere where hundreds of geese gather [in place names]: Hornsea Mere
More example sentences
  • Waters to head for include canals, rivers, gravel pits, lakes, ponds, meres and reservoirs.
  • Little grebes breed on ponds, small lakes and meres, flooded gravel pits and beet factory settling ponds.

Origin

Old English, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch meer 'lake' and German Meer 'sea', from an Indo-European root shared by Russian more and Latin mare.

Definition of mere in:

There are 3 definitions of mere in English:

mere3

Line breaks: mere
Pronunciation: /ˈmɛri
 
/

noun

A Maori war club, especially one made of greenstone.
More example sentences
  • This replicates a traditional Maori War Club used by Maori warriors of old.
  • A Maori warrior made his mere of greenstone, an igneous rock, and ground one side to a sharp edge.
  • The Mere (traditional Maori club) buried in the whales tail is a symbolic act of war.

Origin

Maori.

Definition of mere in: