There are 2 definitions of mood in English:

mood1

Line breaks: mood
Pronunciation: /muːd
 
/

noun

1A temporary state of mind or feeling: he appeared to be in a very good mood about something
More example sentences
  • In this case, a worker may try to dispel a bad mood by suspending work, rather than searching for a new solution.
  • Another way in which emotions and moods affect judgement is the well-known relationship between good mood and overconfidence.
  • Small wonder that your mood and self-esteem are plummeting and you're looking for comfort from food.
Synonyms
frame of mind, state of mind, emotional state, humour, temper; disposition, spirit, tenor, vein
1.1The atmosphere or pervading tone of something: a concept album which captures the mood of modern times
More example sentences
  • Painters in turn portrayed the poems, capturing the moods or personality of the characters or themes.
  • Colour couldn't create the mood and tone I was going for: the character is drained of emotion, devoid of attachment to reality, thus there is no colour.
  • The artistry comes when you take someone else's music, and use it to create a mood or an atmosphere, or send people on an aural journey of sorts.
Synonyms
atmosphere, feeling, spirit, ambience, aura, character, tenor, flavour, quality, climate, feel, tone, key
1.2 [as modifier] (Especially of music) inducing or suggestive of a particular feeling or state of mind: mood music
More example sentences
  • There's a jazz quartet playing mood music under the neon coloured strip lights barely audible in the hubbub of a full bar and seating area.
  • They were playing mood music in the Doctor's surgery as we waited.
  • It would be too easy to turn it into another documentary style presentation complete with archive footage, computer animation and mood music.
Synonyms
2An angry, irritable, or sullen state of mind: he was obviously in a mood
More example sentences
  • Most of the time if Nicole told me to do something, I would, because if I did not do what she told me to, she would get in a mood with me.
  • Natalie just called from the car and she's in a mood.
  • They're the band you put on when you are in a mood.
Synonyms
bad mood, temper, bad temper, fit of bad/ill temper, sulk, pet, the sulks, fit of pique, low spirits, depression, bout of moping, the doldrums, the blues
informal the dumps, grump
British informal paddy
British informal , dated bate, wax

Origin

Old English mōd (also in the senses 'mind' and 'fierce courage'), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch moed and German Mut.

Phrases

in the (or in no) mood for/to do something

Feeling (or not feeling) like doing or experiencing something: she was in no mood for sightseeing
More example sentences
  • Lieutenant Nemeck was not in a good mood, and in no mood to be made fun of by a junior.
  • I was in no mood to pursue the issue but the experience did leave a bad taste in my mouth.
  • Laura scowled, this banter could go on for hours, and tonight she was in no mood for it, handling Ryan was enough for the time being.

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Word of the day erroneous
Pronunciation: ɪˈrəʊnɪəs
adjective
wrong; incorrect

There are 2 definitions of mood in English:

mood2

Line breaks: mood
Pronunciation: /muːd
 
/

noun

1 Grammar A category or form which indicates whether a verb expresses fact (indicative mood), command (imperative mood), question (interrogative mood), wish (optative mood), or conditionality (subjunctive mood).
More example sentences
  • French also has the option of the embedded clause appearing in the subjunctive mood.
  • He wants to move the claim from the conditional to the indicative mood, as the grammarians would say.
  • But the key point here is that it's the subjunctive mood, not the subjunctive case.
2 Logic Any of the valid forms into which each of the figures of a categorical syllogism may occur.

Origin

mid 16th century: variant of mode, influenced by mood1.

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