Definition of nescient in English:

nescient

Line breaks: nes¦ci|ent
Pronunciation: /ˈnɛsɪənt
 
/

adjective

literary
  • Lacking knowledge; ignorant: I ventured into the new Korean restaurant with some equally nescient companions
    More example sentences
    • Echoing Goethe's Romantic interpretation and adulation, Belinsky's Bard ‘understood heaven, earth, and hell’ but was, nonetheless, an ‘ignoramus’, nescient of the meaning of his own plays.
    • This means I can get whipped up into a state of ill-informed indignation, because if I'm going to get indignant it may as well be in quite a pompous and nescient fashion.
    • The cluelessness in his expression's so nescient that it's something close to profound.

Derivatives

nescience

noun
More example sentences
  • It reminds me somewhat of the collusion between cynicism and innocence, in which nescience is the very form that jaded dyspepsia takes.
  • Past, future, and present, these three times are imperceptible, an ignorance or nescience that is not real, only false.
  • This is not to deny Lutyens his aesthetic preferences, but it is to point out that preferences cannot legitimize or wipe out a record of nescience and disdain, and of taking the credit without taking any of the blame.

Origin

late Middle English: from Latin nescient- 'not knowing', from the verb nescire, from ne- 'not' + scire 'know'.

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