Definition of occlude in English:

occlude

Line breaks: oc|clude
Pronunciation: /əˈkluːd
 
/

verb

[with object] formal or • technical
  • 1Stop, close up, or obstruct (an opening, orifice, or passage): thick make-up can occlude the pores
    More example sentences
    • Tumors in the tracheobronchial tree often occlude major airways producing obstructive pneumonitis and hypoxia.
    • Devices for occluding the urethra include urethral plugs and, more recently, expandable urethral devices.
    • All this is jam-packed into your sinuses and other nasal structures, occluding your airway completely.
  • 1.1Shut in: they were occluding the waterfront with a wall of buildings
  • 1.2Cover (an eye) to prevent its use: it is placed at eye level with one eye occluded
    More example sentences
    • They fixated the center of the display while they occluded one eye with the ipsilateral hand.
    • He uses the finding of Wiesel and Hubel, that kittens reared with one eye occluded do not have binocular cells in the visual cortex, to support the converse of Hebb's postulate.
  • 2 [no object] (Of a tooth) come into contact with another tooth in the opposite jaw: in monkeys and apes, the upper canine occludes with the lower first premolar
    More example sentences
    • The peglike first upper molar does not occlude with any tooth of the lower jaw, so it serves no clear function.
    • It consists of a pair of mandibular tooth plates that occludes with two pairs of plates above.
    • The clear implication is that, at least in Idiognathodus, the teeth occluded in a regular and precise way.
  • 3 Chemistry (Of a solid) absorb and retain (a gas or impurity): occluded within these crystals are other molecules
    More example sentences
    • Could the magmatic conditions at depth allow argon to be occluded within the minerals at the time of their formation?
    • If the pore in the closed channel is occluded sterically, such a molecule should be unable to reach substituted cysteines below the gate.
    • H2O molecules can be tightly bound to biological material and are occluded in proteins where they are often involved in catalytic reactions.

Origin

late 16th century: from Latin occludere 'shut up'.

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elaborate ornamentation of a vocal melody