Definition of officiate in English:

officiate

Line breaks: of¦fi¦ci|ate
Pronunciation: /əˈfɪʃɪeɪt
 
/

verb

[no object]

Derivatives

officiation

Pronunciation: /-ˈeɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
More example sentences
  • The grim determination of the ISTJ vindicates itself in officiation of sports events, judiciary functions, or an other situation which requires making tough calls and sticking to them.
  • Inviting me to a recent wedding in Virginia, the proud parents asked if I would do some sort of officiation.
  • ‘Each Rabbi should decide about officiation according to his/her own rabbinic conscience,’ the resolution reads.

officiator

noun
More example sentences
  • He reportedly had great tolerance for many people but little tolerance for the dogmatic officiators of his own religion.
  • After the presidential preference vote, several precinct officers are elected who serve as officiators for the rest of the caucus.
  • A dispute between the organising body and its officiators led to the cancellation of all matches during the bank-holiday weekend.

Origin

mid 17th century: from medieval Latin officiare 'perform divine service', from officium (see office).

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