Definition of one-off in English:

one-off

Line breaks: one-off
informal , chiefly British

adjective

Done, made, or happening only once: a one-off benefit show
More example sentences
  • If what happened in Wales were to happen in England, then, whatever Labour may say now, 7 million homes in England would face big one-off jumps in council tax.
  • The department said it was still too early to say if the improvement in the public finances would continue as some of the increase in tax revenues were from one-off items.
  • Qantas made A $256 million after tax and before one-off items in the six months to December 31.

noun

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1Something done, made, or happening only once: the meeting is a one-off
More example sentences
  • I feel hustle and bustle may be enough to inflict damage in the group stage but once the games become one-offs and we have to go the extra mile to carve out victories I feel we will be once again found lacking.
  • It's a cup game and they are always one-offs so anything could happen.
  • Hopefully it is not a one-off because it happens to be World Environment Day.
1.1A unique or remarkable person: he’s a one-off, no one else has his skills
More example sentences
  • The first thing to say about Rice is that he is a one-off, a unique talent, and he does things his way.
  • I can't understand that mindset, but I also wonder if Jonny is simply a one-off.
  • ‘No-one should think Roy is a one-off in wanting to speak his mind and stand up,’ the Celtic manager pointed out.

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Word of the day apposite
Pronunciation: ˈapəzɪt
adjective
apt in the circumstances or relation to something