Definition of palette in English:

palette

Line breaks: pal|ette
Pronunciation: /ˈpalɪt
 
/

noun

1A thin board or slab on which an artist lays and mixes colours.
More example sentences
  • The artist's easel, paint box, palettes, paintbrushes and dried tubes of paint occupied a corner.
  • The inventory of the contents of his studio made for probate purposes after his death lists a few standard items of equipment - easels, palettes, canvases - but nothing to hint at any unusual working method.
  • The portrait is dominated by her own image, holding a palette and a paintbrush in her hands.
1.1The range of colours used by a particular artist or in a particular picture: Pollock’s hard, bright palette
More example sentences
  • His minimalist style of drawing and limited palette of colours are far from painterly, however.
  • In this, the colour palette is darker and the drawings simpler and more stylised.
  • Its restrained palette, the sinuous, loopy drawing, and the interplay of seemingly simple forms and planes present a highly cerebral visual game.
1.2The range or variety of tonal or instrumental colour in a musical piece: he commands the sort of tonal palette which this music needs
More example sentences
  • His dazzling virtuosity and sweeping tonal palette made the music truly live.
  • His musical palette constantly overflows with colour, never garish yet sometimes opulent and sometimes sombre.
  • She manages beautifully subtle shifts in tempo without crossing over into the soupy, and she applies a large palette of tonal color tastefully.
1.3(In computer graphics) the range of colours or shapes available to the user.
More example sentences
  • The first lesson details the basics, such as the minimum requirements, and customising the work area, palettes and user interface.
  • For example, using tool palettes, users can apply the Door tool to openings, windows and door and window assemblies, converting those objects to door objects.
  • As I mentioned before, most of the useful tools are available as tabbed palettes, and this includes several image transformation tools.

Origin

late 18th century: from French, diminutive of pale 'shovel', from Latin pala 'spade'.

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