Definition of paradigmatic in English:

paradigmatic

Line breaks: para|dig¦mat¦ic
Pronunciation: /parədɪgˈmatɪk
 
/

adjective

Of or denoting the relationship between a set of linguistic items that form mutually exclusive choices in particular syntactic roles. Contrasted with syntagmatic.
More example sentences
  • This occurrence of zero anaphors is much more widespread than that observed in either an English-style, paradigmatic, non-pro-drop language or an Italian-style, paradigmatic, pro-drop language.
  • On the lexical level, paradigmatic contrasts indicate which words are likely to belong to the same word class (part of speech): cat, dog, parrot in the diagram are all nouns, sat, slept, perched are all verbs.

Derivatives

paradigmatically

Pronunciation: /-dɪgˈmatɪk(ə)li/
adverb
More example sentences
  • Because particular devices vary across periods, and because norms tend to be organized paradigmatically, any film must choose only a few possibilities to actualize.
  • As Dummett has noted, in many cases the standard names for paradigmatically abstract objects do not assume the functional form to which the definition adverts.
  • Led by Konrad Lorenz and Niko Tinbergen, the ethologists argued that even learning - a paradigmatically non-instinctive kind of development - often required certain predispositions.

Definition of paradigmatic in:

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Word of the day apposite
Pronunciation: ˈapəzɪt
adjective
apt in the circumstances or relation to something