Definition of paschal in English:

paschal

Line breaks: pas|chal
Pronunciation: /ˈpask(ə)l
 
, ˈpɑːs-/

adjective

formal
  • 1Relating to Easter.
    More example sentences
    • For the New Year a sucking pig roasted was a delicacy worth waiting for and for Easter the paschal baby lamb or goat roasted whole on a spit is universally loved.
    • In the paschal event and the Eucharist that makes it present throughout the centuries, there is a truly enormous ‘capacity’ that embraces all of history.
    • Marriage, like all sacraments, is paschal to the core and consequently it is as much about dying as it is about new life.
  • 2Relating to the Jewish Passover.
    More example sentences
    • According to the Bible, ever since the Israelites made their escape from Egypt in the middle of the night, following their first paschal meal, Passover has been marked by a nighttime ceremony.
    • For the French, a roast leg of lamb, the gigot pascal (pascal and the English paschal refer equally to the Jewish Passover and Christian Easter), is the traditional Easter Sunday lunch.
    • The word paschal actually comes from the Hebrew word for Passover.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French, from ecclesiastical Latin paschalis, from pascha 'feast of Passover', via Greek and Aramaic from Hebrew Pesaḥ 'Passover'.

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