Definition of pauper in English:

pauper

Line breaks: pau¦per
Pronunciation: /ˈpɔːpə
 
/

noun

  • 1A very poor person: he died a pauper
    More example sentences
    • Disease spread rapidly among the half starved and half clothed paupers.
    • And the heat went out of the pursuit eventually, and when he died in 1762, although a pauper, he was no longer a fugitive.
    • This means people will not belong to any of the classes or professions, but will simply be poor and helpless paupers.
    Synonyms
    poor person, indigent, bankrupt, insolvent; beggar, mendicant, down-and-out
    informal have-not
    See also poor
  • 1.1 historical A recipient of relief under the provisions of the Poor Law or of public charity: he was buried in a pauper’s grave
    More example sentences
    • Dickens's rage against the New Poor Law, which precluded able-bodied paupers from relief, is underplayed.
    • By Winter he is penniless, far from home, and buried in an unmarked pauper's grave.
    • I suspect he's buried in a pauper's grave somewhere there in that little town's cemetery, long since forgotten.
  • 1.2US Law A poor person who may bring a legal action without payment of costs.
    More example sentences
    • If we go back to the example of the US Supreme Court, a pauper who has to depend on free legal aid is no match for the billionaire.

Derivatives

pauperdom

noun
More example sentences
  • We and the Russians and the French, and the UN, and the Turks and the other Arabs, permitted millions of people to die or be reduced to misery and pauperdom.
  • It's where every day, your duties can mean the difference between life and death, prosperity and pauperdom, happiness or sadness for thousands and thousands of people.
  • In the volatile economic climate of Georgian Britain, even this slender lifeline might preserve a broken old redcoat from pauperdom or worse.

pauperism

Pronunciation: /-rɪz(ə)m/
noun
More example sentences
  • As land increases in value, poverty deepens and pauperism appears.
  • A creeping process of impoverishment ensued, accelerating progressively to become the generally recognized pauperism of the nineteenth century.
  • Meanwhile, the country continued to descend deeper into fragmentation, general pauperism, and mutual predacity.

pauperization

Pronunciation: /-ˈzeɪʃ(ə)n/
noun
More example sentences
  • They form a community not only by a common religion, but also by common deprivation, vilification, and pauperisation.
  • It symbolized repression, plunder, and pauperization of the people of this country.
  • The pauperization of Micronesia was a direct result of foreign aid.

pauperize

(also pauperise) verb
More example sentences
  • They will have died, lonely, homeless, frightened and pauperised, deserted by us.
  • How many million pounds sterling were siphoned off from India, pauperizing the country?
  • Monetary compensation is a sure way of pauperising the already marginalised, who have traditionally lived off the land.

Origin

late 15th century: from Latin, literally 'poor'. The word's use in English originated in the Latin legal phrase in forma pauperis, literally 'in the form of a poor person' (allowing non-payment of costs).

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