There are 3 main definitions of peck in English:

peck1

Line breaks: peck
Pronunciation: /pɛk
 
/

verb

1 [no object] (Of a bird) strike or bite something with its beak: two geese were pecking at some grain [with object]: vultures pecked out the calf’s eyes
More example sentences
  • I got quite used to tiny black Tussock birds pecking matter-of-factly at my shoes.
  • Mrs Wheeler said she thought the noise made by the burglars was the bad weather or birds pecking on the roof.
  • At first it was thought Pebbles had been pecked by a bird or had been fighting with another cat.
Synonyms
bite, nip, strike, hit, tap, rap, jab, poke, prick
1.1 [with object] Make (a hole) by striking with the beak: robins are the worst culprits, pecking holes in every cherry
More example sentences
  • Apparently the crow pecks a small hole in the toad to get at the liver.
  • A bird with a penchant for 17 th-century Dutch art has paid the ultimate price for flying into a museum gallery and pecking a hole in a masterpiece.
  • He's a prissy fellow, and he takes about 10 or 15 seconds just to peck a hole that is large enough to pull one of the kernels through.
1.2 (peck at) informal (Of a person) eat (food) listlessly or daintily: don’t peck at your food, eat a whole mouthful
More example sentences
  • I was determined not to spend the rest of my life as ‘Fatty the gargantuan’ and so I just pecked at my food, ignoring my rebellious stomach, which was screaming for food like an overweight baby.
  • These dishes were small and neatly packaged, and before long, I found myself pecking at my food in an appraising, sensitive way, and nibbling in tiny little bites.
  • She made a pretence of pecking at her food, then excused herself and retreated to her rooms.
Synonyms
nibble, pick at, pick over, take very small bites from, eat listlessly, toy with, play with, eat like a bird, show no appetite for, eat sparingly of
2 [with object] Kiss (someone) lightly or perfunctorily: she pecked him on the cheek
More example sentences
  • Ashton pulled back from our hot kiss and pecked me once for good measure.
  • I smiled back and pecked him lightly on the cheek.
  • He pecked her lightly on the lips before heading toward the door.
Synonyms
kiss, plant a kiss, give someone a peck
informal give someone a smacker
3 [with object] Type (something) laboriously: Paul was pecking out letters with two fingers on his typewriter
More example sentences
  • This allowed them to input small amounts of text data quickly without having to peck at a tiny keyboard with their fingers.
  • Four middle-aged guys, dressed business-casual, are sitting at a long desk in an off-white room, sifting through files and pecking at laptops.
  • Trading is now done rather demurely, by pecking at a keyboard.
4 [with object] archaic Strike with a pick or other tool: part of a wall was pecked down and carted away

noun

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1A stroke or bite by a bird with its beak: the bird managed to give its attacker a sharp peck
More example sentences
  • Nestlings use this beak hook in lunging pecks and bites to the backs and heads of their siblings that result in scratches, bruises, and skin lesions.
  • Patience finally paid off as one hopped slowly, slowly towards me and I felt the peck of a tiny beak in my hand.
  • The mother bird started to peck at me, but I dodged all the pecks and hit her beak with my mace.
2A light or perfunctory kiss: a fatherly peck on the cheek
More example sentences
  • Lola dotes on him hand and foot, trying to rekindle his emotions, but earns only a perfunctory peck on the cheek at best.
  • He gave her a light peck on the cheek and then returned to his own room.
  • He was changing a light bulb and she gave him a peck on the cheek, and he was in shock.
3 [mass noun] archaic , informal Food: he wants a little more peck

Origin

late Middle English: of unknown origin; compare with Middle Low German pekken 'peck (with the beak)'.

Definition of peck in:

There are 3 main definitions of peck in English:

peck2

Line breaks: peck
Pronunciation: /pɛk
 
/

noun

1A measure of capacity for dry goods, equal to a quarter of a bushel (2 imperial gallons = 9.092 l, or 8 US quarts = 8.81 l).
More example sentences
  • America is now the last major power to retain feet and gallons and bushels and pecks.
  • If you don't know your bushel from your peck take a look.
1.1 archaic A large number or amount of something: a peck of dirt
More example sentences
  • I have a distinct distrust of any man who smells of soap and believe we all have to eat a peck of dirt before we die, but there are limits.
  • As my old Mum used to say, ‘You have to eat a peck of dirt before you die’.
  • We all have to eat a peck of dirt, the saying goes, but some of us enjoy it more than others.

Origin

Middle English (used especially as a measure of oats for horses): from Anglo-Norman French pek, of unknown origin.

Definition of peck in:

There are 3 main definitions of peck in English:

peck3

Line breaks: peck
Pronunciation: /pɛk
 
/

verb

[no object]
(Of a horse) pitch forward or stumble as a result of striking the ground with the front rather than the flat of the hoof: her father’s horse had pecked slightly on landing
More example sentences
  • However, Chilling Place pecked on landing and weakened into third, giving the Grade One race to 3-1 shot Marcel, who kept on to hold It's Just Harry by two lengths.

Origin

variant of obsolete pick 'fix (something pointed) in the ground'.

Definition of peck in: