There are 2 definitions of peg in English:

peg1

Line breaks: peg
Pronunciation: /pɛɡ
 
/

noun

1A short pin or bolt, typically tapered at one end, that is used for securing something in place, hanging things on, or marking a position: she put her mack on a peg in the hall
More example sentences
  • We rode to the lake where I saw 3 more horses tied to a peg stuck in the ground.
  • There he stops, sticking a peg into the ground, and tells his companions to start digging at that spot.
  • Part of the installation process was to pound some pegs into the ground to secure the swing set.
Synonyms
spike, pin, nail, dowel, skewer, rivet, brad, screw, bolt, hook, stick, nog, spigot; Nauticalfid; Curlinghack; Quoitshob; Mountaineeringpiton; Golftee; Rowingthole (pin)
rare knag, spile
1.1 (also tent peg) A pin or bolt driven into the ground to hold one of the ropes or corners of a tent in position.
More example sentences
  • The action is not unlike pushing a tent peg into the ground.
  • The up-and-down swinging arms are on a plane to drive a tent peg into the ground.
  • Darryl hummed inscrutably and looked back down at the tent peg he was trying to hammer into the ground.
1.2British short for clothes peg.
More example sentences
  • Number two and three has to be a clothes line and pegs.
  • If my laundry hadn't dried and the sun was out, with a string round the panniers and a couple of pegs he was a clothes horse as literal as any you'll find.
  • The washed garments are rinsed in a little fresh water and hung outside with pegs over the tent ropes to freeze solid.
1.3A bung for stoppering a cask.
More example sentences
  • Period pieces show a fire polished finish on the peg of the stopper.
1.4 informal A footrest on a motorbike.
More example sentences
  • Your feet rests on pegs, your back is flat on the board and your head is slightly elevated so you are able to see where you are going.
2A point or limit on a scale, especially of exchange rates: the Mexican peso, linked to the dollar by a crawling peg, was distinctly too high
More example sentences
  • The peg will limit the powers of the central banks.
  • Under flexible rates, central banks need not use interest rates to preserve an exchange-rate peg.
  • It is obviously not always feasible to operate with tight exchange rate pegs, such as the currency board, and larger economies find it particularly difficult to maintain such constructions.
3chiefly Indian A measure of spirits: have a peg of whisky
More example sentences
  • He went and told Grierson about the bet that he had with Barua - a peg of whisky, which would knock a mule over.
  • Most drinking scenes in films start with the dialogue ‘you drink two pegs and forget all worries.’
  • Then it's over to flashy dance floors and fast pulsating music that becomes all the more stirring after quaffing a few mugs of chilled beer or a few pegs of booze.
4A place marked by a peg and allotted to a competitor to fish or shoot from.
More example sentences
  • The chosen venue was the far bank, below the dam, and we fished pegs three and four.
  • Often miles of river will be almost devoid of decent fish, whilst a few hot pegs will be flogged to death.
  • Virginia fished on peg 8 whilst I fished next door in peg 7 casting out to the island to my left.
5 informal A person’s leg: I have a good right peg and the ball ended up in the back of the net
More example sentences
  • I'd like Southwell to use his left peg more to drive the ball deep into the opposition's half.
  • Chic is idly caressing the ball with his left peg.
6chiefly Baseball A strong throw.
More example sentences
  • Meanwhile, Santa rounded third and headed for home, as the shortstop finally came to his senses and threw a perfect peg to catcher Yunir Garcia, who held the ball in a collision at the plate.
  • Miraculously, Posada managed to find the ball, whirl and throw a perfect peg down to second to impale the Impaler.
  • Conine scored easily, but as Encarnacion headed home, Boone cut off a strong peg from Matsui and fired across the diamond to try to hold Pierre, conceding the run.

verb (pegs, pegging, pegged)

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1 [with object and adverbial] Fix, secure, or mark with a peg or pegs: drape plants with nets, pegging down the edges
More example sentences
  • Propagate strawberry plants once the crop is finished by pegging down a couple of runners from your best plants.
  • The lines on the docks were basic things: narrow gauge steel tracks pegged directly to the ties.
Synonyms
1.1Hang (washing) on a line with clothes pegs: clothes were pegged out on a line
More example sentences
  • Greying women potter in flower beds across the fence from pregnant mums pegging washing.
  • Mum, who had been a nurse, seemed to be endlessly pegging nappies on the line, and I always had a small sister on one hip.
  • When you wash the sheets and when you reach up to peg them on the clothesline, you can feel the wet cotton against your skin and it's all cool like slipping into a swimming pool.
1.2Allot a specified place to (a competitor) in a fishing or shooting competition by means of a marker: we’ve been pegged next to the winning team
2 [with object] Fix (a price, rate, or amount) at a particular level: the dividend was pegged at 23.59p
More example sentences
  • A student loan starts accruing interest from the moment it is borrowed, but the interest rate is pegged to the retail price index.
  • In response for their support, rates were pegged at their present level for three years in return for keeping its peak-time audience at last year's level.
  • The only saving grace for the moment is that mortgage rates are pegged at reasonable levels, thanks to the EU Bank.
Synonyms
2.1 informal , chiefly North American Form a fixed opinion of; categorize: the officer probably has us pegged as anarchists
More example sentences
  • That's another printmaker that has me pegged as a lunatic.
  • You will also take a letter home to your parents that they will sign, or I'll make sure the school board has you pegged as a troublemaker for the rest of your high school career, am I understood?
  • In case anyone has me pegged as a reliable apologist for the pharmaceutical industry, I'd like to direct you to this article in the Sunday New York Times.
3chiefly Baseball Throw (a ball) hard and low: the catcher pegs the ball to the first baseman
More example sentences
  • You know sometimes when the pitcher sees the guy on first inching his way towards second and pegs the ball to the first baseman, in a feeble attempt to get the fella out?
  • Molly pegged the ball and it hit her in the face.
  • Jamie backed away and pegged the ball, which Brian missed.

Origin

late Middle English: probably of Low German origin; compare with Dutch dialect peg 'plug, peg'. The verb dates from the mid 16th century.

Phrases

off the peg

British (Of clothes) ready-made: [as modifier]: budget off-the-peg outfits
More example sentences
  • Mr Smith goes on: ‘At this time there was not a lot of choice for women buying off the peg, so Poppy's business was in high demand.’
  • It's not about going into a shop, buying an item off the peg and taking it home.
  • They can be bought off the peg or made-to-measure and are in demand for all kinds of events including weddings, parties and a day at the races.

a peg to hang something on

Something used as a pretext or occasion for the treatment of a wider subject: he is used as a peg on which to hang the intricate meshwork of diplomatic relations

a square peg in a round hole

A person in a situation unsuited to their abilities or character: low self-esteem can be exacerbated by a sense of being a square peg in a round hole
More example sentences
  • She said: ‘I was like a square peg in a round hole.’
  • She was still a square peg in a round hole, trying to get her head around a system, timetables, a rigid curriculum and attitudes that didn't take into consideration her particular needs.
  • Asked to play out of position and he looked like a square peg in a round hole in the first half.

take (or bring) someone down a peg or two

Make someone realize that they are less talented or important than they think they are: good to see United taken down a peg or two last evening
More example sentences
  • Nothing makes for taking you down a peg or two like public humiliation.
  • But in the long run, it's a good hurt, because it takes you down a peg or two and reminds you what you're supposed to be doing in the first place.
  • No matter how good you think you are, horses will always take you down a peg or two.
Synonyms
humble, humiliate, mortify, bring/take down, bring low, demean, show up, shame, put to shame, make ashamed, discomfit, disgrace, discredit, downgrade, debase, degrade, devalue, dishonour, embarrass, put someone in their place, make a fool of, chasten, subdue, get the better of, have the last laugh on, abash, abase, crush, squash, quash, deflate, flatten, make someone eat humble pie
informal put down, settle someone's hash, cut down to size
North American informal make someone eat crow

Phrasal verbs

peg away

informal Work hard at or try to achieve something over a long period: the South African attack kept pegging away
More example sentences
  • The bottom of their post must have been square, but we kept pegging away and in the second half we got the goal and I think we deserved to share the points.
  • In contrast, they kept pegging away and, with cooler finishing and a dash of the luck that has deserted them in recent weeks, that 50-point barrier would now be breachable at the weekend.
  • Poppleton kept pegging away and deservedly equalised when a through ball found Christopher Green, who gave Harry Wright in the Real Cliffe goal no chance.
Synonyms
work hard, work away, hammer away, grind away; persevere, persist, exert oneself, apply oneself, keep at it, plod, soldier on
informal slog, beaver (away), plug (away), stick at, stick with it
British informal graft, get one's head down

peg someone back

Reduce or eradicate the lead of an opponent in a contest: they were pegged back by an equalizer from Jameson
More example sentences
  • Within three minutes West Leeds had their first meaningful attack and they had a chance to peg Skipton back with a penalty, but the kick went wide.
  • Failing to take their chances, they had been pegged back to a three-point lead by a side which they had outmuscled and outfought for the opening 40 minutes.
  • Just before half time Keighley were pegged back again.

peg out

1 informal , chiefly British Die: she looked as if she might peg out any moment
More example sentences
  • The man grinding the flour suggested this activity was healthier than a modern gym workout (not that healthy, we decided: half of all Viking women pegged out at 35).
  • After such a marathon 64 years on top, it was scarcely surprising when the Empress of India finally pegged out almost 100 years ago today.
  • Chekhov pegged out while taking a cure in Badenweiler.
2Score the winning point at cribbage.
More example sentences
  • It is not necessary to reach 121 exactly - you can peg out by scoring 2 more when you were on 120 and still win.
3 Croquet Hit the peg with the ball as the final stroke in a game.

peg something out

Mark the boundaries of an area of land: I went out to peg out our assembly area
More example sentences
  • It is essential the site is pegged out before the planning committee visits it, to eliminate any confusion.
  • Rex Watkins the siting coordinator said most of the site had been pegged out and numbered and he is confident the registration process will go smoothly.
  • The new kitchen is pegged out and a safety fence is going up tomorrow!

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Word of the day epyllion
Pronunciation: ɪˈpɪlɪən
noun
a narrative poem resembling an epic in style...

There are 2 definitions of peg in English:

PEG2

Line breaks: PEG

abbreviation

Polyethylene glycol.

Definition of peg in: