There are 3 definitions of perch in English:

perch1

Line breaks: perch
Pronunciation: /pəːtʃ
 
/

noun

1An object on which a bird alights or roosts, typically a branch or horizontal bar: the budgerigar shuffled along its perch
More example sentences
  • Dead branches also make perfect perches for resting birds and are good places to hang feeders.
  • The frame-houses, on the other hand, seem to have alighted like passing birds on unlikely perches.
  • Most of the perches were exposed horizontal stems or branches about 1 cm in diameter.
Synonyms
pole, rod, branch, roost, rest, resting place
1.1A place where someone or something rests or sits, especially one that is high or precarious: Marian looked down from her perch in a beech tree above the road
More example sentences
  • It's on one of the most dramatic stretches of coastline in the country, and rugged perches with ocean views and road frontage will only become more of a rarity with the tightening of planning regulations in areas of scenic beauty.
  • Meanwhile, she rested on a perch, mildly disgusted by all the commotion.
  • Rescue crews plucked thousands of people from trees and rooftops yesterday, but thousands more were left behind, forced to survive yet another night on precarious perches above still rising flood water.

verb

[no object, with adverbial of place] Back to top  
1(Of a bird) alight or rest on something: a herring gull perched on the rails
More example sentences
  • She looked up to see a large, colorful bird perched on the rail, watching her curiously.
  • Scarlet macaws, blue and gold macaws, and hosts of smaller birds perch together in their hundreds to excavate the best clay layer along a riverbank.
  • Over the weekend, the birds will perch on trees all around the neighborhood and wait for the cacophony to die down.
Synonyms
1.1(Of a person) sit on something high or narrow: Eve perched on the side of the armchair
More example sentences
  • As it backs up near one of the houses, a chatter of excitement erupts from the people perched precariously on top of its cargo.
  • We spotted an old man precariously perched on top of a pile of rubble, searching for something.
  • Her design provides a steeply raked underlit playing area upon which the actors perch precariously.
1.2 (be perched) (Of a building) be situated above or on the edge of something: the fortress is perched on a crag in the mountains
More example sentences
  • Whisper glided across the dark bay, having spied in the distance a tall building perched on the edge of a cliff.
  • She leads me along a row of bamboo restaurants perched high above the mangroves.
  • As every self-respecting Yorkshireman knows, this is the highest inn in England, perched at 1,732 above sea level.
Synonyms
be located, be situated, be positioned, be sited, stand
1.3 [with object] (perch someone/thing on) Set or balance someone or something on: Peter perched a pair of gold-rimmed spectacles on his nose
More example sentences
  • Their little bar-stool table was about the size of a postage stamp and they were struggling to share an entrée, perching the plates on their laps, couch-potato style, and totally at odds with the eloquence of the rest of the restaurant.
  • She sat on the other end of the bench seat and perched her feet on the edge of the seat in front of her.
  • When my bedroom was empty except for the waterbed, the lamp, and the stereo, I perched a note on the coffee table in front of the TV.
Synonyms
put, place, set, rest, balance

Origin

late Middle English: the noun from perch3; the verb from Old French percher.

Phrases

knock someone off their perch

informal Cause someone to lose a position of superiority or pre-eminence: will this knock London off its perch as Europe’s leading financial centre?
More example sentences
  • Can anyone really see a midfield knocking them off their perch?
  • The inspectors are irritated because it knocked them off their perch, undermining their authority and purpose on the world stage.
  • But, he knows that it will may take something special to knock them off their perch.

Derivatives

percher

noun
More example sentences
  • Never having been much of a percher, I'm leaning.
  • Big, flat feet are usually found in nearly flightless ground birds or in raptors, but anhimids are active flyers, frequent perchers, and never hunt anything larger than a bug.

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Pronunciation: ˈkraʊdsɔːs
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There are 3 definitions of perch in English:

perch2

Line breaks: perch
Pronunciation: /pəːtʃ
 
/

noun (plural same or perches)

1An edible freshwater fish with a high spiny dorsal fin, dark vertical bars on the body, and orange lower fins.
  • Genus Perca, family Percidae (the perch family): three species, in particular P. fluviatilis of Europe (also called bass2), and the almost identical yellow perch (P. flavescens) of North America. The perch family also includes the pikeperches, ruffe, and darters
More example sentences
  • Out back of the house, oak, hemlock and cedar trees crown a path toward a 30-acre lake stocked with largemouth bass, yellow perch, pumpkinseed sunfish, and more.
  • Fish species most commonly consumed included bass, yellow perch, and walleye.
  • The zander has the rough feel and spiked dorsal fins of the perch, protecting small fish from predation, particularly from pike and herons.
1.1Used in names of other freshwater and marine fishes resembling or related to the perch, e.g. climbing perch, pikeperch, sea perch, surfperch.

Origin

late Middle English: from Old French perche, via Latin from Greek perkē.

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There are 3 definitions of perch in English:

perch3

Line breaks: perch
Pronunciation: /pəːtʃ
 
/

noun

historical , chiefly British
1A measure of length, especially for land, equal to a quarter of a chain or 5 1/ 2 yards (approximately 5.029 m). Also called pole1, rod.
More example sentences
  • This strange measure undoubtedly is related to other archaisms such as the furlong, the perch and the fathom.
  • He begins his analysis by simplifying and generalizing the problem, dispensing with the surveyor's vocabulary of perches and chains and bearings.
  • High street contains about seventy houses, is 90 feet in width, and 180 perches in length.
2 (also square perch) A measure of area, especially for land, equal to 160th of an acre or 30 1/ 4 square yards (approximately 25.29 sq. metres). Also called pole1, rod, square pole, square rod.
More example sentences
  • It was part of an area of 15 acres, three roods and four perches originally granted to him.
  • It is described in Griffith's Valuation of 1857 as containing one acre two roods and five perches and owned by him.
  • In 1914, 1 acre was taken for a pumice quarry, and subsequently 3 roods, or 27.8 perches, were returned to the descendants of those owners.

Origin

Middle English (in the general sense 'pole, stick'): from Old French perche, from Latin pertica 'measuring rod, pole'.

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